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I have the following Console app that makes a single request to a web page and returns its server status eg. 200, 404, etc..

How would I change it to:

Ask user for:

Url to request How many parallel connections to use(concurrent users) How long(seconds) to submit as many requests as it can

Show Total Fetches Show Fetches per Second Show Average Response Time (ms)

I imagine the best way to do it is to run multiple http fetches in parallel and run in a single process, so it doesn't bog down the client machine.

I really like C# but I'm still new to it. I've researched other articles about this but I don't fully understand it so any help would be greatly appreciated.

My Code:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
        try
        {
            HttpWebRequest webRequest = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create("http://10.10.1.6/64k.html");
            webRequest.AllowAutoRedirect = false;
            HttpWebResponse response = (HttpWebResponse)webRequest.GetResponse();
            //Returns "MovedPermanently", not 301 which is what I want.

            int i_goodResponse = (int)response.StatusCode;
            string s_goodResponse = response.StatusCode.ToString();
            Console.WriteLine("Normal Response: " + i_goodResponse + " " + s_goodResponse);
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
        catch (WebException we)
        {
            int i_badResponse = (int)((HttpWebResponse)we.Response).StatusCode;
            string s_badResponse = ((HttpWebResponse)we.Response).StatusCode.ToString();
            Console.WriteLine("Error Response: " + i_badResponse + " " + s_badResponse);
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }

Some possible code that I found:

void StartWebRequest()
{
    HttpWebRequest webRequest = ...;
    webRequest.BeginGetResponse(new AsyncCallback(FinishWebRequest), webRequest);
}

void FinishWebRequest(IAsyncResult result)
{
    HttpWebResponse response = (result.AsyncState as HttpWebRequest).EndGetResponse(result) as HttpWebResponse;
}
share|improve this question
    
So you are looking to develop a console app to use for load testing of a website or similar? – Chris Ballard Apr 2 '11 at 15:13
    
If true, you have to be wary that the statistics you collect may actually be limited by the bandwidth (CPU and/or Network) of the client machine, rather than the web server you are testing, no matter how many requests you try to run in parallel – Chris Ballard Apr 2 '11 at 15:15
    
correct. That is precisely what I'm trying to do. The page in my sample is a 64kb html file. As for bandwidth, I'm on an intranet. I was just hoping for some code snippets that aren't so random... – Vini Apr 2 '11 at 15:23

This is actually a good place to make use of the Task Parallel Library in .NET 4.0. I have wrapped your code in a Parallel.For block which will execute a number of sets of requests in parallel, collate the total times in each parallel branch, and then calculate the overall result afterwards.

int n = 16;
int reqs = 10;

var totalTimes = new long[n];

Parallel.For(0, n, i =>
    {
        for (int req = 0; req < reqs; req++)
        {
            Stopwatch w = new Stopwatch();
            try
            {
                w.Start();

                HttpWebRequest webRequest = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create("http://localhost:42838/Default.aspx");
                webRequest.AllowAutoRedirect = false;
                HttpWebResponse response = (HttpWebResponse)webRequest.GetResponse();

                w.Stop();
                totalTimes[i] += w.ElapsedMilliseconds;


                //Returns "MovedPermanently", not 301 which is what I want.            
                int i_goodResponse = (int)response.StatusCode;
                string s_goodResponse = response.StatusCode.ToString();
                Console.WriteLine("Normal Response: " + i_goodResponse + " " + s_goodResponse);
            }
            catch (WebException we)
            {
                w.Stop();
                totalTimes[i] += w.ElapsedMilliseconds;

                int i_badResponse = (int)((HttpWebResponse)we.Response).StatusCode;
                string s_badResponse = ((HttpWebResponse)we.Response).StatusCode.ToString();
                Console.WriteLine("Error Response: " + i_badResponse + " " + s_badResponse);
            }
        }
    });

var grandTotalTime = totalTimes.Sum();
var reqsPerSec = (double)(n * reqs * 1000) / (double)grandTotalTime;

Console.WriteLine("Requests per second: {0}", reqsPerSec);

The TPL is very useful here, as it abstracts away the detail of creating multiple threads of exececution within your process, and running each parallel branch on these threads.

Note that you still have to be careful here - we cannot share state which is updated during the tasks between threads, hence the array for totalTimes which collates the totals for each parallel branch, and only summed up at the very end, once the parallel execution is complete. If we didn't do this, we are open to the possibility of a race condition - where two seperate threads attempt to update the total count simultaneously, potentially corrupting the result.

I hope this makes sense and is useful as a start for you (I only calculate requests per second here, the other stats should be relatively easy to add). Add comments if you need further clarifications.

share|improve this answer
    
While using the following parameters I've encountered an Unhandled Exception within the catch block. // n = n page fetches int n = 100; // reqs = parallel requests(concurrent users) int reqs = 64; Error line: int i_badResponse = (int)((HttpWebResponse)we.Response).StatusCode; Error Description: NullReferenceException was unhandled by user code. My theory is I've reach the limit the server can support and now it is not responding or something similar. How can I catch and output this Exception? – Vini Apr 2 '11 at 16:53
    
check if we.Response is null before accessing we.Response.StatusCode - probably is some sort of client side timeout, hence no response coming back from the server – Chris Ballard Apr 2 '11 at 16:55
    
Perfect. Just to clarify. Is it safe to assume that, given variables n = 16 and reqs = to 10, I am in fact simulating 10 concurrent users requesting the page 16 times over and measuring the time it took to complete this task? – Vini Apr 2 '11 at 17:07
    
The other way around - 16 concurrent users. 10 requests. As I initially mentioned though - be careful as the limitation may well be the client machine rather than the server, so if you can, it may be better to run on 2 or 3 client PCs simultaneously – Chris Ballard Apr 2 '11 at 17:17
    
10 requests per user * 16 = 160 total requests. – Vini Apr 2 '11 at 17:22

You have already answered your own question, you can use BeginGetResponse to start async request.

Another, and more convenient method might be using WebClient class, if you are more familiar with events then with AsyncResult.

DownloadDataCompletedEventHandlerd

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