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I have a database I'm working on designing using Access 2007 and I'm wondering what the best way to accomplish the following would be.

I have four tables:

  1. Injury
  2. Treatment
  3. Invoice
  4. Payment

I want there to be zero, one or more Notes entries for each of these table entries.

Obviously, I could do this:

  1. InjuryNotes
  2. TreatmentNotes
  3. InvoiceNotes
  4. PaymentNotes

But I'd prefer to do this:

  1. Notes

But I'm stuck as far as how to do the referencing. Do I need to consider a lookup table?

  1. Notes
  2. NotesLookup

So that I can have...

  1. Injury
    • InjuryID ...
  2. Treatment
    • TreatmentID ...
  3. Invoice
    • InvoiceID ...
  4. Payment
    • PaymentID
  5. Notes
    • NotesID
    • Note
  6. NotesLookup
    • TableName
    • ID
    • NoteID

Is this the best way to do it in Access? Is there a better/more natural way, especially one that allows me to rely on the in-built way that Access would handle the save/derefencing (so I don't have to code up a VBA solution)?

I suppose I could eliminate the NotesLookup table and merge TableName and ID into Notes. At this stage, I'm just wondering how I'm going to save that information and how I'm going to dereference on view.

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2 Answers 2

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Go with the "obvious" approach of 4 notes tables:

  1. InjuryNotes
  2. TreatmentNotes
  3. InvoiceNotes
  4. PaymentNotes

Since these model separate entities that seem to have a specific meaning. That is, you wouldn't store injury notes in the same place that you would store treatment notes in the real world, which you are modeling, would you?

This design also ensure that when querying for these you don't have to use either magic numbers or an extra join on the notes lookup table you are suggesting.

Additionally, if any of the notes tables needs to change (additional data that needs to be captured with each note of a specific type, for example), the change will not have an impact on the other note types.

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But they're four tables with the same structure... It just feels wrong, but that is the simplest/easiest way to do it. –  Jared Farrish Apr 2 '11 at 16:55
1  
@Jared - At the moment they are. Until you find out that injuries need some other meta data on their notes. –  Oded Apr 2 '11 at 16:55
    
That's an interesting point. I don't know that I want to use a series data field to capture metadata though, unless I wanted to capture a change over time or something. –  Jared Farrish Apr 2 '11 at 16:57
    
I had once had a single table that I had to split off because of differentiated data. I didn't find it very difficult; so if the need is unforeseen, I would sure much prefer the single table. –  Smandoli Apr 2 '11 at 16:58
1  
Also, I have handled the same problem (differentiated data) with another field dedicated to the need. This field obviously may be null a lot of the time ... no problem. –  Smandoli Apr 2 '11 at 17:00
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Make the notes table have a second field for type of record. If you want legibility over DB efficiency, just use INJ, TRT, INV, PAY. No look-up table needed. This is fully adequate.

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In that case though, how would I know on record view what notes to display? –  Jared Farrish Apr 2 '11 at 16:59
    
You must filter: WHERE RecordType = 'PAY' –  Smandoli Apr 2 '11 at 17:01
    
I know that, but I want to stay away from too much behind-the-scenes stuff for this particular project. While practical from a coding point of view, it might be problematic for this particular project. –  Jared Farrish Apr 2 '11 at 17:04
    
I see this matches your last proposed solution: "merge TableName and ID into Notes." Yes, that's my recommendation. You just have to master this querying. Personally I find tending that is less tedious than managing tables. –  Smandoli Apr 2 '11 at 17:07
    
"too much behind-the-scenes stuff" -- that's a strong consideration. I guess you are experienced enough with Access to know that herding all the forms and reports can be a chore. –  Smandoli Apr 2 '11 at 17:09
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