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How do I loop this?

p = Table[RandomChoice[{Heads, Tails}, 2 i + 1], {i, 10}];
v = Count[#, Heads] & /@ p;
c = Count[#, Tails] & /@ p;
f = Abs[v - c];
g = Take[f, LengthWhile[f, # != 3 &] + 1]

Thanks!

EDIT

In this coin flipping game the rules are as follows :

  • A single play consists of repeatedly flipping a fair coin until the difference between the number of heads tossed and the number of tails is three.
  • You must pay $1 each time the coin is flipped, and you may not quit during the play of the game.
  • You receive $8 at the end of each play of the game.

    1. Should you play this game?
    2. How much might you expect to win or lose after 500 plays?

You may use a spreadsheet simulation and/or reasoning about probabilities to answer these questions.

The class is using Excel, I'm trying to learn Mathematica.

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1  
Will f ALWAYS contain a 3? –  TomD Apr 2 '11 at 20:05
1  
What are you trying to accomplish with this? –  Mr.Wizard Apr 2 '11 at 20:13
    
@wizard-I want to create several lists that represent a certain game. Each "Loop" represents a different round. –  Corshot Apr 2 '11 at 20:35
    
@Tom D- Yes. As long as we take it out far enough.i.e.I may need more than 10. –  Corshot Apr 2 '11 at 20:35
1  
@Corshot, I am wondering what kind of statistics you will be generating using the code above, because I am thinking there may be an analytic solution for what you are doing, rather than the "Monte Carlo" approach. –  Mr.Wizard Apr 2 '11 at 22:33

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If I understand the rules of the coin flipping game, and if you must use a Monte Carlo method, consider this:

count = 
  Table[
    i = x = 0;
    While[Abs[x] < 3, x += RandomChoice[{1, -1}]; i++];
    i,
    {15000}
  ];

The idea is to flip a coin until one person is winning by three, and then output the number of turns it took to get there. Do this 15,000 times, and create a list of the results (count).

The money you spent to play 15,000 games is simply the number of turns that were played, or:

Total @ count

(* Out=  135108 *)

While your winnings are $8 * 15,000 = $120,000, so this is not a good game to play.

If you need to count the number of times each number of turns comes up, then:

Sort @ Tally @ count
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+1 Non-Monte Carlo answer added –  belisarius Apr 3 '11 at 11:05
    
I used this, I hope you don'tind. It was much clearer than mine. –  Corshot Apr 6 '11 at 16:22

A little bit more on the theoretical side

Your game is a random walk on R1.

As such, the expectancy value for the number of flips to get a distance of 3 is 32=9, and that is also the expectancy value for your cost.

As your earning per game is $8, you'll lose at a mean rate of $1 per game.

Note that these figures are consistent with @Mr. Wizard's result of 135108 - 120000 = 15108 for 15000 games.

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Thanks you. I didn't mean to cause so much trouble. –  Corshot Apr 3 '11 at 16:13
1  
@Corshot No trouble at all, tell us what you did at last! –  belisarius Apr 3 '11 at 16:15
    
I'm afraid to ask, because I want to try and Loop the next idea by myself. –  Corshot Apr 3 '11 at 16:23
2  
@Corshot, it's no trouble. I cannot speak for others, but I am glad to help, or I wouldn't be here. If you are going to use Mathematica more, you should learn what you can on your own, but ask whatever questions you need to. I suggest you read Leonid Shifrin's book: mathprogramming-intro.org/book/Book.html Be sure to try out what you see, and if something doesn't make sense and work as expected, ask us. I don't expect you to understand everything in that book at once, so I suggest you either skim, taking what you can, then read it again, working through it gradually. –  Mr.Wizard Apr 3 '11 at 20:34
    
@ Wizard Great Book!Thanks. –  Corshot Apr 4 '11 at 3:23

Not sure if this is the best way to accomplish what you want, but this should get you started. First, note that I changed the names Heads and Tails to lowercase (Heads is a built-in symbol...)---lowercase variable names are the best way to avoid this type of problem.

Remove[p, v, c, fun, f, g, head, tail];
fun[n_] :=
 Do[
  Block[
   {p, v, c, f, g},
   p = Table[RandomChoice[{head, tail}, 2 i + 1], {i, 10}];
   v = Count[#, head] & /@ p;
   c = Count[#, tail] & /@ p;
   f = Abs[v - c];
   g = Print[Take[f, LengthWhile[f, # != 3 &] + 1]]
   ],
  {n}]

Simply enter the number of times you want to run the loop... fun[5] gives:

{1,1,1,1,5,3}

{3}

{1,1,5,1,5,1,3}

{3}

{1,5,3}

Note: because you'll probably want to do something with the output, using Table[] is probably better than Do[]. This will return a list of lists.

Remove[p, v, c, fun, f, g, head, tail];
fun[n_] :=
 Table[
  Block[
   {p, v, c, f, g},
   p = Table[RandomChoice[{head, tail}, 2 i + 1], {i, 10}];
   v = Count[#, head] & /@ p;
   c = Count[#, tail] & /@ p;
   f = Abs[v - c];
   g = Take[f, LengthWhile[f, # != 3 &] + 1]
   ],
  {n}]

Nothing fancy!

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wow. learning alot. –  Corshot Apr 2 '11 at 20:37

A little more Mathematica-ish. No vars defined.

g[n_] := Table[(Abs /@ Total /@ 
             Array[RandomChoice[{-1, 1}, (2 # + 1)] &, 10]) /.
                                        {x___, 3, ___} :> {x, 3}, 
          {n}]  

Credit to @Mr.Wizard for this answer.

g[2]
->{{1, 1, 1, 5, 5, 1, 5, 7, 3}, {1, 3}}
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Thanks for the credit on that little bit. –  Mr.Wizard Apr 2 '11 at 22:34

I don't like bitching about RTFM etc. but looping is pretty basic. If I type "loop" in the search box in the documentation center one of the first few hits contains a link to the page "guide/LoopingConstructs" and this contains a link to the tutorial "tutorial/LoopsAndControlStructures". Have you read these?

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1  
Mma docs can be (to say the less) daunting at first. I feel we should not discourage newbie questions, but just point them in the right direction. If you understand some question doesn't deserve an answer, just comment on it, or let it be. –  belisarius Apr 2 '11 at 22:14
    
@belisarius I agree with you that we should encourage newbie questions. However, questions that can be readily found in the docs with minimal effort should be directed to the manual. Do you feel that the answer you gave as a response to a novice that asks about looping is appropriate? I think it is neither at novice level nor about looping. In order to understand your answer the poor guy has to read several chapters of docs, which doesn't seem to be his intention at the moment. Again, not trying to quarrel here as I really appreciate your work here. –  Sjoerd C. de Vries Apr 3 '11 at 8:20
1  
Of course my answer is not at a novice level. But I posted it after telefunkenvf14 posted his, which I consider much more up to the current OP's abilities. I posted mine just to show him how one could try to do it without vars and loops. My main point is that Mma has a steep learning curve, and the docs are useful as a reference, but not as a tutorial. Perhaps my first comment was harsh, and I was off my road there, sorry. I also had a feeling of discomfort with these serial questions, posted by a mathematician, but I wanted to ensure a place for novices to ask some silly ... (cont) –  belisarius Apr 3 '11 at 8:53
    
... questions without receiving RTFM answers. Of course five very basic questions in a row is a little too much, but still. –  belisarius Apr 3 '11 at 8:55

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