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I would like to exploit Scala's type system to constrain operations in a system where there are versioned references to some values. This is all happening in some transactional context Ctx which has a version type V attached to it. Now there is a Factory to create reference variables. They get created with a creation version attached them (type parameter V1), corresponding to the version of the context in which the factory was called.

Now imagine that some code tries to access that reference in a later version, that is using a different Ctx. What I want to achieve is that it is prohibited to call access on that Ref in any version (Ctx's V type field) that doesn't match the creation version, but that you are allowed to resolve the reference by some substitution mechanism that returns a new view of the Ref which can be accessed in the current version. (it's ok if substitute is called with an invalid context, e.g. one that is older than the Ref's V1 -- in that case a runtime exception could be thrown)

Here is my attempt:

trait Version

trait Ctx {
  type V <: Version
}

object Ref {
  implicit def access[C <: Ctx, R, T](r: R)(implicit c: C, view: R => Ref[C#V, T]): T =
    view(r).access(c)

  implicit def substitute[C <: Ctx, T](r: Ref[_ <: Version, T])
                                      (implicit c: C): Ref[C#V, T] = r.substitute(c)
}
trait Ref[V1 <: Version, T] {
  def access(implicit c: { type V = V1 }): T // ???
  def substitute[C <: Ctx](implicit c: C): Ref[C#V, T]
}

trait Factory {
  def makeRef[C <: Ctx, T](init: T)(implicit c: C): Ref[C#V, T]
}

And the problem is to define class method access in a way that the whole thing compiles, i.e. the compound object's access should compile, but at the same time that I cannot call this class method access with any Ctx, only with one whose version matches the reference's version.

Preferably without structural typing or anything that imposes performance issues.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

FYI, and to close the question, here is another idea that I like because the client code is fairly clutter free:

trait System[A <: Access[_]] {
  def in[T](v: Version)(fun: A => T): T
}

trait Access[Repr] {
  def version: Version
  def meld[R[_]](v: Version)(fun: Repr => Ref[_, R]): R[this.type]
}

trait Version

trait Ref[A, Repr[_]] {
  def sub[B](b: B): Repr[B]
}

object MyRef {
  def apply[A <: MyAccess](implicit a: A): MyRef[A] = new Impl[A](a)

  private class Impl[A](a: A) extends MyRef[A] {
    def sub[B](b: B) = new Impl[B](b)
    def schnuppi(implicit ev: A <:< MyAccess) = a.gagaism
  }
}
trait MyRef[A] extends Ref[A, MyRef] {
  // this is how we get MyAccess specific functionality
  // in here without getting trapped in more type parameters
  // in all the traits
  def schnuppi(implicit ev: A <:< MyAccess): Int
}

trait MyAccess extends Access[MyAccess] {
  var head: MyRef[this.type]
  var tail: MyRef[this.type]
  def gagaism: Int
}

def test(sys: System[MyAccess], v0: Version, v1: Version): Unit = {
  val v2 = sys.in(v0) { a => a.tail = a.meld(v1)(_.head); a.version }
  val a3 = sys.in(v2) { a => a }
  val (v4, a4) = sys.in(v1) { a =>
    a.head = a.head
    println(a.head.schnuppi) // yes!
    (a.version, a)
  }
  // a3.head = a4.head // forbidden
}
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Ok, I think I arrived at some solution (sorry for different trait names here, the beast is a moving target ; think of World as being the new Ctx):

trait World[Repr <: World[_]] {
  type Next <: Repr
}

trait State[W]
trait Ref[W] { def set(state: State[W]): Unit }

trait System[W <: World[W]] {
  def makeState[W1 <: W](implicit w: W1): State[W1]
  def makeRef  [W1 <: W](implicit w: W1): Ref  [W1]
  def t[W1 <: W, T](pred: W1)(fun: W1#Next => T): T
}

 

def test[W <: World[W]](sys: System[W], w0: W): Unit = {
  val (s1, w1) = sys.t(w0) { implicit w1 =>
    val s1 = sys.makeState
    val r1 = sys.makeRef
    r1.set(s1)   // ok
    (s1, w1)
  }

  val w2 = sys.t(w1) { implicit w2 =>
    val s2 = sys.makeState
    val r2 = sys.makeRef
    r2.set(s2)   // ok
 // r1.set(s2)   // yes, forbidden!
 // r2.set(s1)   // yes, forbidden!
    w2
  }

  val w3 = sys.t(w2) { implicit w3 =>
    val s3 = sys.makeState
    val r3 = sys.makeRef
    r3.set(s3)   // ok
 // r3.set(s1)   // still forbidden :)
    w3
  }
}

Now if I could just do sys.t { implicit w => ... } instead of sys.t( pred ) { implicit w => ... } that would make me fully happy. Any clues how to get over the need to store the W#Next value in the client code?

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Still not sure I'm doing this right, but this looks pretty solid to me now:

trait Version {
  type Step <: Version
  def step: Step
}

trait Ctx[V <: Version] { def step: Ctx[V#Step] }

type AnyRf[T] = Ref[_, T]

trait Ref[V <: Version, T] {
  def access(implicit c: Ctx[V]): T
  def substitute[V1 <: Version](implicit c: Ctx[V1]): Ref[V1, T]
}

trait Factory {
  def makeVar[V1 <: Version, T](init: T)(implicit c: Ctx[V1]): Ref[V1, T]
}

 

def shouldCompile2b[V1 <: Version](r: AnyRf[String])(implicit c: Ctx[V1]): String = {
  val r1 = r.substitute(c)
  r1.access(c)
}

def shouldCompile3[V1 <: Version](r: Ref[V1, String])(implicit c: Ctx[V1]): String = 
  r.access(c)

def shouldCompile4[V1 <: Version](f: Factory)(implicit c: Ctx[V1]): String = {
  val r = f.makeVar("Hallo")
  r.access(c)
}

 

def versionStep[V1 <: Version](c: Ctx[V1]): Ctx[V1#Step] = c.step

case class CtxImpl[V <: Version](v: V) extends Ctx[V] {
  def step: Ctx[V#Step] = CtxImpl(v.step)
}

case class VersionImpl(cnt: Int) extends Version {
  type Step = Version
  def step: Version = VersionImpl(cnt + 1)
}

val FirstVersion: Version = VersionImpl(0)

 

def shouldCompile6(f: Factory): Unit = {
  val c0   = new CtxImpl(FirstVersion)
  val r0   = f.makeVar("Hallo")(c0)
  val c1   = versionStep(c0)
  val r1   = f.makeVar("Welt")(c1)
  r0.access(c0)
  r1.access(c1)
  val r0s  = r0.substitute(c1)
  r0s.access(c1)
}

// def shouldFail6a(f: Factory): Unit = {
//    val c0   = new CtxImpl(FirstVersion)
//    val r0   = f.makeVar("Hallo")(c0)
//    val c1   = versionStep(c0)
//    r0.access(c1)
// }

// def shouldFail6b(f: Factory): Unit = {
//    val c0   = new CtxImpl(FirstVersion)
//    val c1   = versionStep(c0)
//    val r1   = f.makeVar("Welt")(c1)
//    r1.access(c0)
// }

Any thoughts?

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Well, it is in fact redundant, as I can remove the type field from Ctx altogether now:

trait Version

trait Ctx[V1 <: Version]

type AnyCtx   = Ctx[_ <: Version]
type AnyRf[T] = Ref[_ <: Version, T]

object Ref {
  implicit def access[V <: Version, R, T](r: R)(
    implicit c: Ctx[V], view: R => Ref[V, T]): T = view(r).access(c)

  implicit def substitute[V <: Version, T](r: AnyRf[T])(
    implicit c: Ctx[V]): Ref[V, T] = r.substitute( c )
}
trait Ref[V1 <: Version, T] {
  def access(implicit c: Ctx[V1]): T
  def substitute[V <: Version](implicit c: Ctx[V]): Ref[V, T]
}

trait Factory {
  def makeVar[V <: Version, T](init: T)(implicit c: Ctx[V]): Ref[V, T]
}

// def shouldCompile1[V <: Version](r: AnyRf[String])(implicit c: Ctx[V]): String = r

def shouldCompile2[V <: Version](r: AnyRf[String])(implicit c: Ctx[V]): String = {
  val r1 = Ref.substitute(r)
  r1.access(c)
}

// def shouldFail[V <: Version](r: AnyRf[String])(implicit c: Ctx[V]): String = 
//   r.access(c)

Make me wonder what the whole point about the type fields is. I'm still hoping they can safe me some characters... Any reason why I should prefer the previous answer over this? As I can remove the suspicious variance annotation for Ctx's V1 now, this seems better to me...

EDIT:

This is wrong—as this compiles:

def shouldFail2(r: Ref[Version, String])(implicit c: Ctx[Version]): String = 
  r.access(c)

—obviously I do need path dependent types to make this safe. Still it looks all shaky to me...

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The following seems to work:

trait Version

trait Ctx[+V1 <: Version] {
  type V = V1
}

type AnyCtx   = Ctx[_ <: Version]
type AnyRf[T] = Ref[_ <: Version, T]

object Ref {
  implicit def access[C <: AnyCtx, R, T](r: R)(
    implicit c: C, view: R => Ref[C#V, T]): T = view(r).access(c)

  implicit def substitute[C <: AnyCtx, T](r: AnyRf[T])(implicit c: C): Ref[C#V, T] =
    r.substitute( c )
}
trait Ref[V1 <: Version, T] {
  def access(implicit c: Ctx[V1]): T
  def substitute[C <: AnyCtx](implicit c: C): Ref[C#V, T]
}

trait Factory {
  def makeVar[C <: AnyCtx, T](init: T)(implicit c: C): Ref[C#V, T]
}

// def shouldCompile1(r: AnyRf[String])(implicit c: AnyCtx): String = r

def shouldCompile2(r: AnyRf[String])(implicit c: AnyCtx): String = {
  val r1 = Ref.substitute(r)
  r1.access(c)
}

// def shouldFail(r: AnyRf[String])(implicit c: AnyCtx): String = r.access(c)

So the follow-up questions are

  1. why I need a redundancy of the type parameter for Ctx to achieve this. I hate that these type parameters accumulate like rabbits in my code.
  2. why shouldCompile1 doesn't compile —can i get the implicits to work as planned?

EDIT:

This is wrong, too. The variance annotation is wrong. Because now the following compiles although it shouldn't:

def versionStep(c: AnyCtx): AnyCtx = c // no importa

def shouldFail3[C <: AnyCtx](f: Factory, c: C): String = {
  val r    = f.makeVar("Hallo")(c)
  val c2   = versionStep(c)
  r.access(c2)
}
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