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Today is my first day in JavaScript. The book (JavaScript Definitive Guide) has an excersice printing all the factorials.

This is what I did:

<html>
<b><head> Factorial - JavaScript - Ex1</head></b>
<body>
        <h2> Factorials List </h2>
<script>

        var fact = 1; 
        var num = 1;
        for(num <= 10; num++)
            {
                fact=fact*num;
                document.write(num + "! = " + fact + "<br>");

            }
</script>
</body>
</html>

There is a problem which I don't exactly know. I checked the book and the way that writer solved it was by initializing the variable num inside the loop FOR. I did that and it worked. But what is the difference between that and mine?

Enlighten me Experts :)

share|improve this question
    
Can you put the writers code in your question just for comparison? –  webdad3 Apr 2 '11 at 19:48
    
And you might want to start accepting answers if you expect answers back... –  webdad3 Apr 2 '11 at 19:49
2  
Young Padawan, you must read Douglas Crockford's JavaScript: The Good Parts - and each page needs about twenty read-agains. amazon.com/JavaScript-Good-Parts-Douglas-Crockford/dp/… –  karim79 Apr 2 '11 at 19:50
    
Thanks @Jeff. It was a mistake I made actually. @karim79 yes this book is good too. But many people suggested me to start with JS By David. –  Mohammad Fadin Apr 2 '11 at 19:59

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

A for loop's syntax must be

for (<initializer>; <condition>; <increment>) {
    <body>
}

While any of <initializer>, <condition> and <increment> can be omitted, none of the semicolons ; can be removed. That means, your for loop must be written with an extra semicolon:

var num = 1;
for(; num <= 10; num++)
//  ^

Or just move the var num = 1; into the for, which is normally what people would do:

for (var num = 1; num <= 10; num ++) 
//   ^^^^^^^^^^^^
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much! I don't use FOR loop much not even in Java. This is really useful information. Okay but how about if I wanted to use While loop? –  Mohammad Fadin Apr 2 '11 at 19:55
    
@Mohammad: var num=1;while(num<=10){<body>;num++;}. Actually the for loop is equivalent (if there's no break/continue) to a while loop in the form <initializer>;while(<condition>){<body>;<increment>;} –  KennyTM Apr 2 '11 at 19:58
    
Thank you again. I really missed using {for loop}. I'm going to read about it and do some exercise for it in java first. much appreciated I also never started reading JS book the code was shown in the first chapter as an example on how client side looks like. But I started solving it :D –  Mohammad Fadin Apr 2 '11 at 20:18

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