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I can't for the life of me figure out what's wrong with this code:

ClassA & doSomething (std::set<boost::shared_ptr<ClassB const> const > const & someSet)
{
  std::set<boost::shared_ptr<ClassB> > secondSet;
  for (std::set<boost::shared_ptr<ClassB const> const >::const_iterator it = someSet.begin(); it != someSet.end(); it++)
  {
    if (checkSomething(*it))
      secondSet.insert(boost::const_pointer_cast<ClassB>(*it));
  }
}

When I try to compile, I get the following errors at line 4 (the start of the for loop) from g++:

/usr/include/c++/4.4/ext/new_allocator.h:79: error: ‘const _Tp* __gnu_cxx::new_allocator<_Tp>::address(const _Tp&) const [with _Tp = const boost::shared_ptr<const ClassB>]’ cannot be overloaded
/usr/include/c++/4.4/ext/new_allocator.h:76: error: with ‘_Tp* __gnu_cxx::new_allocator<_Tp>::address(_Tp&) const [with _Tp = const boost::shared_ptr<const ClassB>]’

If I change the std::set declaration to contain non-const boost::shared_ptr the code compiles perfectly, but that mean I won't be able to enforce const-correctness in my code.

Has anyone got any idea as to what might be causing these errors? I've searched both Google & StackOverflow without any luck.

Here is a minimum (non-)working example:

#include <set>
#include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>

class ClassB;

class ClassA
{
   public:
      ClassA & doSomething (std::set<boost::shared_ptr<ClassB const> const > const & someSet);
};

ClassA & doSomething (std::set<boost::shared_ptr<ClassB const> const > const & someSet)
{
   std::set<boost::shared_ptr<ClassB> > secondSet;
   for (std::set<boost::shared_ptr<ClassB const> const >::const_iterator it = someSet.begin(); it != someSet.end(); it++)
   {
      if (checkSomething(*it))
         secondSet.insert(boost::const_pointer_cast<ClassB>(*it));
   }

   return (*this);
}
share|improve this question
    
That is not 'an exception'. It's a compile error –  sehe Apr 2 '11 at 21:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

but that mean I won't be able to enforce const-correctness in my code

I think you may be wrong there. As long it is a smart pointer to a const object, you may only manipulate the pointers in the set, not the objects referred to. This is kind of the whole point, because a set cannot organize itself if it cannot touch the values.

It's the classical difference between

const char* x; // pointer to const char
const char* const x; // constant pointer to const char
char* const x; // constant pointer, to non-const char

Only this time with smartpointers. You can also verify for yourself that this simple test will fail for const items:

#include <set>

int main()
{
    std::set<const int> a;
    a.insert(1);
    return 1;
}

Once you remove 'const' it will work.


OT: If you want some container that has some kind of 'key' protection, you should perhaps look at map since in the value_type (std::pair) the key (.first) is always const - IIRC. I still think the point is moot with regard to const correctness of the container's elements.

share|improve this answer
    
So it is impossible to create sets with const members? –  Darhuuk Apr 2 '11 at 21:40
    
Updated ansnwer should be convincing –  sehe Apr 2 '11 at 21:42

§23.1/3 states that std::set key types must be assignable and copy constructable; clearly a const type will not be assignable.

share|improve this answer
    
Isn't the constness an attribute of the object and not of the object's type? –  celavek Apr 2 '11 at 21:47
    
@celavek Nope.. –  sehe Apr 2 '11 at 21:49
    
@sehe So just as an example there are two "types" of int in C++, the normal int and the constant int ... "The const qualifier explicitly declares a data object as something that cannot be changed". Would you care to elaborate your answer please? –  celavek Apr 2 '11 at 21:55
    
@celavek: not really, but here goes my attempt: X has implicit conversion to const X but not vice versa. Only const methods can be called through const objects/pointers. The same goes for pointers to const types –  sehe Apr 2 '11 at 21:58
    
@sehe I'm really aware of that and I was not talking about that. You said the constness is not an attribute of the object but of the object's type by negating (or negatively answering) my question in the first comment. But as you don't really care to elaborate then let's drop it off. –  celavek Apr 2 '11 at 22:12

I do have boost to try it but i think you should const the ClassB but not the shared_ptr, try removing the middle const (on the shared_ptr).

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