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Please consider the following code:

$start = microtime();
for($i = 2; $i < 100; $i++)
{
    for($y = 2; $y <= sqrt($i); $y++)
    {
        if($i%$y != 0)
        {
            continue;
        }
        else
        {
          continue 2;
        }
    }

    echo $i.',';
}
echo "\nFinished in " . (microtime() - $start);

Given that the above code effectively uses continue 2 to break the inner loop and skip any code post the inner loop, why does the following code on average execute faster when it appears to do more:

 $start = microtime();
for($i = 2; $i < 100; $i++)
{
    $flag = true;
    for($y = 2; $y <= sqrt($i); $y++)
    {
        if($i%$y != 0)
        {
            continue;
        }
        else
        {
          $flag = false;
          break;
        }
    }

    if($flag === true) echo $i.',';
}
echo "\nFinished in " . (microtime() - $start);

Thanks for any input.

_____ Update ____________

Thanks for the feedback but we seem to have missed the point. Regardless of if this is good programming practice I was trying to understand why the performance difference (which is tiny but consistent) is not within the bias I expected.

The passing of true to microtime seems insignificant as both samples are measured using the same method with the same overhead and the same inaccuracy.

More than one run was tested, as implied by use of the word average.

Just for illustration please consider the following small samples using microtime(true) which shows the same pattern as using microtime().

I know this is a small sample but the pattern is quite clear:

Continue 0.00037288665771484 0.00048208236694336 0.00046110153198242 0.00039386749267578 0.0003662109375

Break 0.00033903121948242 0.00035715103149414 0.00033307075500488 0.00034403800964355 0.00032901763916016

Thanks for looking, and thanks for any further feedback.

______ UPDATE Further investigation ____________

Interestingly if the echo statements are removed from the code the continue performs faster, with the echo statements in place break is faster.

Please consider the following code sample, and consider that the results are in conflict dependant on if the echo statements are removed or not:

<?php
$breakStats = array();
$continueStats = array();

ob_start();
for($i = 0; $i < 10000; $i++)
{
   $breakStats[] = doBreakTest();
   $continueStats[] = doContinueTest();
}
ob_clean();

echo "<br/>Continue Mean " . (array_sum($continueStats) / count($continueStats));
echo "<br/>Break Mean " . (array_sum($breakStats) / count($breakStats));

function doBreakTest()
{
    $start = microtime(true);
    for($i = 2; $i < 100; $i++)
    {
        $flag = true;
        $root = sqrt($i);
        for($y = 2; $y <= $root; $y++)
        {
            if($i%$y != 0)
            {
                continue;
            }
            else
            {
                $flag = false;
                break;
            }
        }
    }

    if($flag === true) echo $i . '';
    return microtime(true) - $start;
}

function doContinueTest()
{
    $start = microtime(true);
    for($i = 2; $i < 100; $i++)
    {
        $root = sqrt($i);
        for($y = 2; $y <= $root; $y++)
        {
            if($i%$y != 0)
            {
                continue;
            }
            else
            {
                echo $i . '';
                continue 2;
            }
        }
    }
    return microtime(true) - $start;
}

Echo statements present :

Continue Mean 0.00014134283065796 Break Mean 0.00012669243812561

Echo statements not present :

Continue Mean 0.00011746988296509 Break Mean 0.00013022310733795

Note that by removing the echo statement from the break and flag test we also remove the ($flag === true) check, so the load should reduce, but continue in this case still wins. W

So in a pure continue n versus break + flag scenario, it appears that continue n is the faster contstruct. But add an equal number of identical echo statements, and the continue n performance flags.

This makes sense to me logically that continue n should be faster, but I would have expected to see the same with the echo statements present.

This is clearly a difference in the generated opcodes, and the position of the echo statement (inner loop vs outer loop) does anyone know a way of seeing the opcodes generated? This I suppose is ultimatley what I need as I am trying to understand what is happening internally.

Thanks :)

share|improve this question
    
Are the outputs the same? Can you paste them here? – Preet Sangha Apr 2 '11 at 21:56
1  
Ehm, how much faster? And you should be using microtime(TRUE) to get a float that's useful for comparison. – mario Apr 2 '11 at 21:57
6  
Benchmarking with a single run is pointless. Time 10,000 script runs and take an average to get useful data. And then consider how much faster it really is (if at all), and how much it really matters to you. – Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 2 '11 at 22:00
    
You should avoid such excessive usage of continue and break in loops. Consider using while instead. Dont use functions in the test-expression of a for-loop. – KingCrunch Apr 2 '11 at 22:00
1  
They're executing in just about the same amount of time here on PHP 5.3.6. It's a microbenchmark though, so whatever difference you may experience is due to how it's implemented internally in PHP. – Josh Davis Apr 2 '11 at 22:14

Yes, first one is bit faster. It's because it just jumps out on continue 2 and prints $i.

2nd example has more job to do... assign value to $flag variable, jumps out of loop, checks $flag's value, checks $flag's type (compares too) and then prints out $i. It's bit slower (simple logic).

Anyways, has it any purpose?

Some of my results for comparing

0.0011570 < 0.0012173
0.0011540 < 0.0011754
0.0011820 < 0.0012036
0.0011570 < 0.0011693
0.0011970 < 0.0012790

Used: PHP 5.3.5 @ Windows (1000 attempts; 100% first was faster)

0.0011570 < 0.0012173
0.0005000 > 0.0003333
0.0005110 > 0.0004159
0.0003900 < 0.0014029
0.0003950 > 0.0003119
0.0003120 > 0.0002370

Used: PHP 5.3.3 @ Linux (1000 attempts; 32% first : 68% second was faster)

0.0006700 > 0.0004863
0.0003470 > 0.0002591
0.0005360 > 0.0004027
0.0004720 > 0.0004229
0.0005300 > 0.0004366

Used: PHP 5.2.13 @ Linux (1000 attempts; 9% first : 91% second was faster)

Sorry, I don't have any more servers for testing :) Now I think it mostly depends of hardware (and maybe depends of OS too).

Generally: It proves only that Linux server is faster than one run at Windows :)

share|improve this answer
    
Maybe you are right, but the question suggests, that the first one is slower, not faster. – KingCrunch Apr 2 '11 at 22:14
    
@KingCrunch: maybe but I put that code into test and every single run first one was faster. – Wh1T3h4Ck5 Apr 2 '11 at 22:15
    
@Wh1T3h4Ck5 Interesting observation, can I ask what platform and PHP version? – Gavin Apr 2 '11 at 22:21
    
Look edit bellow numbers – Wh1T3h4Ck5 Apr 2 '11 at 22:23
1  
@Gavin: This is for you mate (10,000 attempts x 3 servers). You were right, 2nd is faster... much faster. service-kl.com/code/results.zip Complete results from my last test, improved one with microtime(true). – Wh1T3h4Ck5 Apr 2 '11 at 23:59

The continue 2 version is slightly faster for me. But these aren't the types of things you generally need to concern yourself with. Consider:

for($y = 2; $y <= sqrt($i); $y++)

Here you are calculating the sqrt on every iteration. Just changing that to:

$sqrt = sqrt($i);
for($y = 2; $y <= $sqrt; $y++)

will give you a much better improvement than switching between two nearly identical loop styles.

The continue 2 should be used if you find that it's easier for you to understand. The computer doesn't really care.

To address your update regarding looking at opcodes, see:

php -d vld.active=1 -d vld.execute=0 -f foo.php

share|improve this answer
    
excellent points reference code readability and taking calculations out of the for intitialiser. To put this in context we were not really looking for the fastest way to acheive this per say. We were discussing answers to interview questions, and in discussion I suggested that the continue 2 method would perform marginally better than the break version. We tested it, and on my hardware and our server, I was wrong. I just dont understand why. – Gavin Apr 2 '11 at 23:09
    
@Gavin, if you aren't discussing the fastest way, then this question wouldn't even be asked. ;) I understand the curiosity, but the approaches are so similar, it's nearly impossible to benchmark it in any meaningful manner, especially when it's not even close to being the bottleneck. A better test (but still basically useless) would be one that included no echo statements. – Matthew Apr 3 '11 at 0:59
    
@Gavin, see pecl.php.net/package/vld if you want to compare opcodes. I don't think it will be too helpful though. I think an understanding of how the Zend engine works and how modern compilers + computers optimize and do predictions would be more useful. – Matthew Apr 3 '11 at 18:42

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