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I have a number of records stored in a MongoDB I'm trying to output them to the browser window by way of a Node.JS http server. I think I'm a good portion of the way along but I'm missing a few little things that are keeping it from actually working.

The code below uses node-mongo-native to connect to the database.

If there is anyone around who can help me make those last few connections with working in node I'd really appreciate it. To be fair, I'm sure this is just the start.

var sys  = require("sys");
var test = require("assert");
var http = require('http');

var     Db              = require('../lib/mongodb').Db,
        Connection      = require('../lib/mongodb').Connection,
        Server          = require('../lib/mongodb').Server,
        //BSON          = require('../lib/mongodb').BSONPure;
        BSON            = require('../lib/mongodb').BSONNative;

var     host = process.env['MONGO_NODE_DRIVER_HOST'] != null ? process.env['MONGO_NODE_DRIVER_HOST'] : 'localhost';
var     port = process.env['MONGO_NODE_DRIVER_PORT'] != null ? process.env['MONGO_NODE_DRIVER_PORT'] : Connection.DEFAULT_PORT;

sys.puts("Connecting to " + host + ":" + port);

function PutItem(err, item){
    var result = "";
    if(item != null) {
            for (key in item) {
                    result += key + '=' + item[key];
            }
    }
    // sys.puts(sys.inspect(item))  // debug output
    return result;
}

function ReadTest(){
    var db = new Db('mydb', new Server(host, port, {}), {native_parser:true});
    var result = "";
    db.open(function (err, db) {
            db.collection('test', function(err, collection) {
                    collection.find(function (err, cursor){
                            cursor.each( function (err, item) {
                                    result += PutItem(err, item);
                            });
                    });
            });
    });
    return result;
}

http.createServer(function (req, res) {
  res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'});
  res.end("foo"+ReadTest());
}).listen(8124);
console.log('Server running on 8124');

Sources: - mongo connectivity code: https://github.com/christkv/node-mongodb-native/blob/master/examples/simple.js - node. http code: nodejs.org

EDIT CORRECTED CODE

Thanks to Mic below who got me rolling in the right direction. For anyone interested, the corrected solution is here:

function ReadTest(res){
    var db = new Db('mydb', new Server(host, port, {}), {native_parser:true});
    var result = "";
    res.write("in readtest\n");
    db.open(function (err, db) {
            res.write("now open\n");
            db.collection('test', function(err, collection) {
                    res.write("in collection\n");
                    collection.find(function (err, cursor){
                            res.write("found\n");
                            cursor.each( function (err, item) {
                                    res.write("now open\n");
                                    var x = PutItem(err, item);
                                    sys.puts(x);
                                    res.write(x);
                                    if (item == null) {
                                            res.end('foo');
                                    }
                            });
                    });
            });
    });
}

http.createServer(function (req, res) {
    res.writeHead(200, {'Content-Type': 'text/plain'});
    res.write("start\n");
    ReadTest(res);
}).listen(8124);
console.log('Server running on 8124');
share|improve this question
1  
I assume the err in each of those function definitions is for an error status -- do any of them report an error? –  sarnold Apr 2 '11 at 22:17
    
no errors, I've taken the connection code from someone on github, and the HTTP server from node's homepage. (added links to the question above) both code samples work on their own, additionally adding sys.puts(sys.inspect(item)) in the PutItem function shows that I'm reading the database correctly. –  Alex C Apr 2 '11 at 22:22
1  
Are the calls to db blocking calls? If not, I presume result will actually be returned and written to your http response before it is populated by anything. –  Mic Apr 2 '11 at 22:27
    
node-mongo-native is said to be non-blocking. so you might be right about that. I'm going to try to change the res.end for res.write and see if that works. Also think I'll have to pass the res into the ReadTest function. Will update if you're right. :) –  Alex C Apr 2 '11 at 22:35
    
Have you tried a wrapper like mongoose? It should make the entire database connection simpler. –  Raynos Apr 2 '11 at 23:04
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3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

My guess is that you are returning result, writing the response, and closing the connection before anything is fetched from the db.

One solution would be to pass the response object to where you actually need it, something like:

function readTest(res) {
    db.open(function (err, db) {
        db.collection('test', function(err, collection) {
            collection.find(function (err, cursor) {
                res.writeHead(200, {'Content-type' : 'text/plain'});
                cursor.each( function (err, item) { res.write(item); });
                res.end();
     ...

Of course, you should also handle errors and try to avoid nesting too many levels, but that's a different discussion.

share|improve this answer
    
Sadly, that didn't work. Something's still missing. edit I double checked and have found that string data is correctly returning from PutItem. there may be a few things I can still try along this line. –  Alex C Apr 2 '11 at 22:48
1  
Just to be on the safe side, you removed 'res.end("foo"+ReadTest());' right? The only res.end should be in the readtest function. And are you getting anything at all, like an exception or an error? –  Mic Apr 2 '11 at 22:57
    
... hold on... making progress with this line of questioning. you might still be right :) –  Alex C Apr 2 '11 at 22:59
    
YES! you were right. I will update the original post with the corrected code so anyone interested can see –  Alex C Apr 2 '11 at 23:08
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Instead of writing all the low-level Mongodb access code, you might want to try a simple library like mongous so that you can focus on your data, not on MongoDB quirks.

share|improve this answer
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You might want to try mongoskin too.

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