Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Every day I always come across this dilemma - is it best practice to check for an undesired state at the start of a function and return straight away or, is it best practice to check for a desired condition and continue else return false.

I understand that there wont be a 1 fits all solution and that this is really a style issue but I am just interested in what other developers would typically do.

I always find my self being indecisive every time this situation comes up.

As an example (coded in php):

Check for the undesired condition first...

function myFunction($myVal)
{
    if ($myVal != 'desiredVal') {
        return false;
    }

    //Continue here with main function code

    return true;
}

Or, check for the desired condition first...

function myFunction($myVal)
{
    if ($myVal == 'desiredVal') {
        //continue here with main function code

        return true;
    }

    return false;
}
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's largely a matter of style and both are correct. I find error checking at the top followed by the main method functionality to be cleaner and easier to follow.

The best advice would be to pick a style and be consistent with it.

share|improve this answer

For non-trivial functions, I'd always rather have the first style; if you ever have to look up more than eight to ten lines of code to find the condition that results in return false;, then I'd say it is a great hindrance to legibility. If the functions are short enough to be read in one small chunk (eight lines, ten lines), then either approach is fine, keeping in mind that functions tend to grow over time. That would argue for picking the first style and sticking with it, so you have greater consistency in your codebase.

share|improve this answer

I prefer the first case, simply because you then don't have the rest of the function's logic wrapped up inside an If statement. In the second style if "main function code" in this case is quite long, you can start to lose track of what that first If was. I also find that if the logic for what is considered "good" input starts getting more complicated, you can wind up with either a very long If or a set of nested Ifs where the actual functionality is nested deep.

With the first case, if you wind up having to test several conditions to determine if you have the desired values and can proceed, you can simply add more Ifs after the first one, and have any of them return false on a failure. To me, that's easier to maintain and follow.

That said as others have mentioned this is a style thing and both methods are correct. The most important thing is to try and be consistent.

share|improve this answer

I found this a good read - Tom Duff's "Reading code from top to bottom", section "else considered harmful", http://iq0.com/notes/deep.nesting.html - unfortunately the link is currently dead. But it basically boils down to what the others said. Plus of course, in the first variant, you have more space available to the right due to the lower indent level of the //main function code.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.