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Wouldn't it be possible to have an OS entirely in Python if the Python VM itself is build into a hardware? Something like the good old Lisp Machine?
Suppose I have a cpu that is the hardware implementation of the python virtual machine, then all programs written in python would perform with the speed of assembly, won't it (but Python is mostly interpreted but we can compile it)?
If we have such a 'python-microprocessor', what about the memory and other subsystems? Would it be compatible with the current memory.
Is there any information on the registers and the Python VM architecture, something similar to what we have for 8086?

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(1) Python is compiled. In most implementations to bytecode, and some (most notably PyPy in that it's a completely compatible implementation) compile to C or directly to machine code. (2) As everything else, assembly/machine code is only as fast as the thing that runs it. It's certainly possible to build a processor that runs e.g. the CPython bytecode instructions. Making it run as fast as a modern x64 processor is a different task much closer to impossible. –  delnan Apr 3 '11 at 0:44
    
See also google pypy+fpga (+ within the last year). –  denis Jun 16 '11 at 13:38
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5 Answers

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Wouldn't it be possible to have an OS entirely in Python if the Python VM itself is build into a hardware? Something like the good old Lisp Machine?

Yes, theoretically it would be possible.

Suppose I have a cpu that is the hardware implementation of the python virtual machine, then all programs written in python would perform with the speed of assembly, won't it (but Python is mostly interpreted but we can compile it)?

Python doesn't have a speed, it's a language. The speed of the interpreter (in this case the processor) can be tested. But just as it's difficult to compare the performance of a RISC and a CISC processor, comparing Assembly with Python will be difficult too.

If we have such a 'python-microprocessor', what about the memory and other subsystems? Would it be compatible with the current memory.

The python microprocessor would have to do the memory management (and thus the garbage collection). Since that's normally done by the interpreter, now the microprocessor has to do it.

Is there any information on the registers and the Python VM architecture, something similar to what we have for 8086?

Normally you don't access the memory directly in Python, so the registers shouldn't be relevant here.

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Oh, didn't think about garbage collection. ok, that will make the circuit more complex. But why did we have a Lisp machine then? –  kadaj Apr 3 '11 at 1:01
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Similar things were tried for Java, but none really took the world by storm.

Yeah, it might be possible, but designing new hardware is expensive. Would the return on investment justify building such a toy? I'd guess not, otherwise someone would have tried it by now. :)

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There is really big iron that runs Java natively. And yes, it is quite expensive. For example IBM's zAPP and Azul's Vega. –  Mackie Messer Apr 3 '11 at 13:33
    
@Mackie Messer, awesome; I love that kind of insanely big hardware. Back in school, we saw photos of Java Workstations, complete with monitors, keyboards, and mice, that were going to replace the PC. It seems kind of a cute joke now, but zAPP and Vega sure sound awesome. Nothing like those workstations. :) –  sarnold Apr 4 '11 at 1:56
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Suppose I have a cpu that is the hardware implementation of the python virtual machine, then all programs written in python would perform with the speed of assembly, won't it (but Python is mostly interpreted but we can compile it)?

Yes it would be assembly speed. See this link for a comparison with an avr microcontroller assembly code. http://pycpu.wordpress.com/code-examples/speed-pycpu-vs-8bit-avr/. It is a hardware implemntation of a cpu that can do very very limited python bytecode. But enought for ifs conditions and while loops with simple integers.

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In the 70ties such ideas were quite popular. The idea was to close the semantic gap between compilers/virtual machines and instruction set architectures, and thereby bring programming languages and hardware closer together. However, when Patterson and Ditzel published The Case for the Reduced Instruction Set Computer (PDF, 672KB) and after the success of RISC and the microprocessor, the idea of closing the semantic gap was basically dead.

Now, with ever increasing transistor counts the idea may become interesting again. But, as others already noted, designing chips is costly. You need a very good reason to sink so much money. But it is definitely possible. IBM and Azul have shown this with their massively parallel Java Chips.

I guess you should call Google and convince them that they urgently need a Python processor. ;-)

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What means "with ever increasing transistor counts the idea may become interesting again"? –  Bakudan May 20 '11 at 11:42
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@Bakudan: Nowadays transistors are essentially free, and instead the limit is power consumption. In the past it was just the other way around. Therefore today complex architectures are reasonable, if they don't use excessive amounts of power. E.g. a Python interpreter on a common microprocessor is very likely less power efficient that a more complex, dedicated Python processor. –  Mackie Messer May 20 '11 at 15:58
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New operating systems are interesting and cool, and basing one off of python would be cool. Then again, linux is so good and has so much development for it already. It would have to be the "right time".

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