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After a lot of studying, I am starting to code my first app.

In my code I have a class called "Measurement". I want to implement an array of Measurements. This array of Measurements needs to be accessible across multiple view controllers, so I have created a custom class called "MeasurementsArray" for the array, and made it into a singleton.

I have done this, and the code works as expected. But now that I have it working, I want to make sure that I have easy to understand code, and that I am following conventional objective-c design patterns.

If it weren't for fact that I need the array of Measurements to be a singleton, it would seem that this array belongs inside the "Measurement" class as a class method. But my understanding is that there can be only one instance of a class when it is a singleton.

But somehow, having a separate class named "MeasurmentsArray" seems a little hacky to me.

My question:

Am I approaching this the right way, or am I missing something?

If I do need the split off the array of Measurements to a separate class in order to have it be a singleton, does "MeasurementsArray" seem like an appropriate class name? If not, please provide a naming convention you would use for this type of situation.

Edit: After some inital answers, some clarification regarding the function of the app might help.

It is a fitness application that records, saves and tracks body fat percentage and body weight. Every time the user records his body fat and weight, it becomes an instance of the class "Measurement". The array of Measurements is needed in order to track changes in weight and body fat over time. A singleton is needed because multiple view controllers need access to the array.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A singleton is needed because multiple view controllers need access to the array.

There are other, better ways to share data between objects than to rely on a singleton.

View controllers are usually created either by the application delegate or by another view controller. The application's data model (in this case, that's your measurements array) is often also created ether by the application delegate. So when the app delegate creates a view controller, it can also give that controller a pointer to the data model. If that controller creates any view controllers, it can likewise share its pointer to the data model.

Passing the data model along from app delegate to view controller and from one view controller to the next makes your code easier to maintain, test, reconfigure, and reuse because it avoids depending on some predetermined, globally accessibly object.

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The fact that I only have 5 view controllers, all called from a single "main" view controller makes this solution the most elegant for this situation. All the different approaches provided proves to me that coding is definitely as much an art as a science. –  Matt Miller Apr 3 '11 at 13:26

Having a singleton at all may be a wrong move. There are times that a singleton is appropriate, but there's usually a better choice.

It sounds like you may already be implementing something resembling the Model-View-Controller pattern, which would be appropriate. In this context, this array of measurements is part of your model, and it may make sense for it to be a separate class, but there's likely no need for it to be a singleton.

The name MeasurementsArray is implementation-specific. I would be more inclined to call it just Measurements or to give it a name reflecting what the measurements are measuring.

In fact I wonder about the name of your Measurement class. What is it measuring? What does it actually represent?

If you post some code, we might be able to provide more specific ideas.

Based on your update and a bit of thinking, you might want to think about The Repository Pattern. Rather than having your controllers hold the array, they have access to the repository from which they can get it.

My thinking here is that your array of measurements might be supplied by a MeasurementRepository and that while now the data might be a single simple array that the repository just holds, it might evolve to something that is stored in a database per user and with variation over time, so that your repository supplies more complex access.

Rather than having this repository be a singleton (though that is certainly sometimes done), it might better be just created once and then injected into everything that needs it. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dependency_injection and Uncle Bob's blog

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Good point, some context regarding the function of the app might help. It is a fitness application that records, saves and tracks body fat percentage and body weight. Every time the user records his body fat and weight, it becomes an instance of the class "Measurement". The array of Measurements is needed in order to track changes in weight and body fat over time. A singleton is needed because multiple view controllers need access the array. I will edit original post to reflect these details. –  Matt Miller Apr 3 '11 at 2:20
    
Even though I marked Caleb as the correct answer, your answer helped me better understand my specific problem - mostly that I have a very simple, single user app that doesn't require any db connections. I would have voted up if I had the rep. Thanks! –  Matt Miller Apr 3 '11 at 13:22
    
Glad I was able to help. I've also just upvoted the question, which brings you a bit closer to voting capability! –  Don Roby Apr 3 '11 at 13:41

If I understand you correctly, the measurements array represents past measurements of a specific user.
If that is the case- you're not looking for a singleton at all.
remember that a singleton is a single value PER APPLICATION, and what you're looking for here is a single value PER USER.
Don Roby is absolutely right- Measurements is probably a property of the User class. for example (I'm using c# notation, but you get the hang of it...):

public class User
{
    public string Name {get; set;}
    public int Id {get; set;}
    public Measurement[] Measurements {get; set;} //one array per-user... 
}
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I feel that a separate class is probably overkill unless it has several methods of its own, in which case it might be justified. This problem may just be an artefact of your app's structure not (yet) being well defined. Is data going to be persistent across sessions? If so, will there be a "manager" class on which you could put a property to retrieve the array; something like allMeasurements on the MeasurementStore class? Another option would be to store the array in your app delegate.

I find that if I continue working on an app, it becomes obvious how I should structure it.

Edit: To elaborate, there's nothing "wrong" with your approach; there's probably just nicer ways to do it.

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I like class name allMeasurements a lot better than my MeasurementsArray. The problem I am having with putting all the code in one class is the singleton issue. (See my question for details). –  Matt Miller Apr 3 '11 at 2:30

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