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Ex

class A () {

  class A(int a, int b) {
  }

}

class B extends A {

   int m;
   int n;

   class B()
   {
      getInput(); // i wanna invoke this method first before calling super(). But it does not allow in Java. How to work around this ?
      super(m,n);
   }

   public void getInput() {
        Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);
        m = scanner.nextInt();
        n = scanner.nextInt();
   }

   public static void main () {
      B b = new B();
   }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can force your super class to run a method at the beginning of its constructor and then override that method in the subclass. Many frameworks have a "setup" type method that you can override to accomplish such things.

public class A {
   protected int a; // 'protected' so subclass can see it
   protected int b;

   public A() {
       setup(); // Runs whatever setup method is implemented, even in subclasses
   }

   protected void setup() { /* nothing */ }  // 'protected' to be overridden by subclass
}

public class B extends A {

   public B()
   {
      super();
   }

   /**
    *  When A's constructor calls setup(), this method will run.
    */
   @Override
   protected void setup() {
      Scanner scanner = new Scanner(System.in);
      a = scanner.nextInt(); // Stores value in A's protected variable.
      b = scanner.nextInt();
   }  
}

Depending on the specifics of the classes you're writing, this is where you might have multiple constructors, public or protected methods for setting values, etc. This is where Java is fairly flexible. As the comments below indicate, this isn't a very good practice in constructors, but I'd need more context to figure out how to accomplish what you're asking.

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But is it recommended design to use overrideable methods in a constructor? –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Apr 3 '11 at 2:07
    
Nope :) This is where context would be helpful as opposed to this A and B stuff. Perhaps you set 'a' and 'b' in B's constructor after calling the super() and A doesn't require the use of 'a' and 'b' immediately. –  jbrookover Apr 3 '11 at 2:17
    
After further reading on the subject, I don't see anything inherently wrong with using overrideable methods in a constructor. All of the examples state that if your overridden method uses subclass fields that are initialized in the subclass constructor, they won't have been initialized yet. This is an obvious side-affect of the order of execution. Are there more flexible, fool-proof ways to do it? Yes. Is this inherently wrong? I don't think so. –  jbrookover Apr 3 '11 at 2:43
    
One reason that this can be dangerous is illustrated here: Constructors shouldn't call overridables –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Apr 3 '11 at 3:08
    
I saw that link - I think it simply illustrates that your overriding methods shouldn't access variables that haven't been initialized, which is true in any situation. –  jbrookover Apr 3 '11 at 3:17

You could chain multiple constructors together as jbrookover alluded to in such a manner. Sligtly convoluted though:

class A () {
  public A(int a, int b) {
  }
}

class B extends A {

   int m;
   int n;

   public B()
   {
      this(new Scanner(System.in));
   }

   private B(Scanner scanner) {
       this(scanner.nextInt(),scanner.nextInt())
   }

   private B(int m, int n) {
       super(m,n)
       this.m = m;
       this.n = n;
   }

   public static void main (String ... args) {
      B b = new B();
   }
}
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