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Although it seems pretty simple, I'm not sure of the most efficient way of doing this.

I have two vectors:

std::vector<bool> a;
std::vector<int> b;

a.size() necessarily equals b.size().

each bool in a corresponds to an int in b. I want to create a function:

bool test(std::vector<bool> a, std::vector<int> b);

This function returns true if the values in a are equal. However, it only considers values in a that correspond to true values in b.

I could do this:

bool test(std::vector<int> a, std::vector<bool> b){
    int x;
    unsigned int i;
    for(i = 0; i < a.size(); ++i){
        if(b.at(i) == true){
            x = a.at(i);
            break;
        }
    }
    for(i = 0; i < a.size(); ++i){
        if(b.at(i) == true){
            if(a.at(i) != x){
                return false;
            }
        }
    }
    return true;
}

But then I have to create two loops. Although the first loop will stop at the first true value, is there a better way?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your solution looks good enough to me:

  • Each loop does a different thing anyway (so you shouldn't worry about duplication)
  • You don't use extranious variables or flags that complicate the code.

The only problems I see are:

  • You start the second loop at 0 instead of where you left off.
  • Doing if(condition == true) is very ugly. Just do if(condition) instead.

bool test(std::vector<int> a, std::vector<bool> b){
    int x;
    unsigned i;
    for(i = 0; i < a.size(); i++){
        if(b.at(i)){
            x = a.at(i);
            break;
        }
    }
    for(i++; i < a.size(); i++){
        if(b.at(i)){
            if(a.at(i) != x){
                return false;
        }
    }
    return true;

}

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You can do it in one loop if you remember if you have seen the first true element in b or not. Also, you should take the a and b parameters by reference to avoid unnecessary copying. And finally, if you know that the indices into a vector are always within valid range (i.e. between 0 and vector.size() - 1, inclusive), you can use operator[] instead of at, and achieve better peformance (at does a range check, while operator[] does not). Heres a modified version of your test function considering all the above points:

bool test(std::vector<int> const& a, std::vector<bool> const& b){
    int x;
    bool first = true;
    for(unsigned i = 0, n = a.size(); i != n; ++i){
        if( b[i] ){
            if( first ) {
                x = a[i];
                first = false;
            }
            else if( x != a[i] ) {
                return false;
            }
        }
    }
   return true;
}
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I am not a big fan of control-flow boolean variables. It looks like you are doing this "in one loop" just for the sake of it. –  hugomg Apr 3 '11 at 5:02

Provided you know a.size() == b.size() just create a single loop that compares an 'a' element to a 'b' element at the same time at each iteration. Once you see that a[i] != b[i] then you know the containers don't match and you can break out.

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I believe that is not what he wants to do –  Pablo Apr 3 '11 at 4:32

I am not 100% certain I know what you want to do but a straight compare once you know you have equal size

std::equal(a.begin(), a.end(), b.begin(), std::equal_to<bool>())
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