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I am getting a unusual error:

error: expected unqualified-id before ‘&’ token

Source code:

// Overloading the c++ array subscript operator [ ]

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

const int size=10;

class myArray
{
      int a[size];
    public:
      myArray()
      {}
      int & operator [](int);
      void print_array();   
};

int myArray & operator [](int x) // This is the line where error is as by compiler
{
          return a[x];
}

void myArray::print_array()
{
    for (int j=0; j < 10; j++)
        cout<<"array["<<j<<"] = "<<a[j]<<"\n";
}

int main()
{
    myArray instance;
    for (int i=0; i < size; i++)
     {
       instance[i] = i;
     }  
    instance.print_array();

    cout<<"\n\n";
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
You defined your print_array method correctly, which means that you are familiar with C++ syntax for method definitions. Yet, the syntax in the operator [] definition is completely screwed up to the point of becoming a meaningless sequence of tokens. How is that possible? – AnT Apr 3 '11 at 6:02
    
I am learning the concept of operator overloading and I have also tried the way as recommended below, but with no success – Samrat Mazumdar Apr 3 '11 at 6:33

You need to tell the compiler that your operator [] function is a member of myArray:

int & myArray::operator [](const int x) 
{
          return a[x];
}

For more info, this page has decent examples.

share|improve this answer
    
After doing the above I am getting a lot of error: [link] (cl.ly/5hUN) – Samrat Mazumdar Apr 3 '11 at 6:20
    
Compile C++ code with g++, not gcc. And turn on warnings! Add -Wall in the g++ parameters. – Mat Apr 3 '11 at 6:59

The problem is with your definition of the operator []

int myArray & operator [](int x) // This is the line where error is as by compiler
{
          return a[x];
}

Should be:

int & myArray::operator [](const int x) 
{
          return a[x];
}

Also, as an suggestion [] is usually overloaded so as to avoid crossing the array bounds. So your [] overloading should ideally check x against size before dereferencing the array at that index. Without such an checking the whole purpose of overloading the [] is defeated.

share|improve this answer
    
"Without such an checking the whole purpose of overloading the [] is defeated." -- No it isn't. The purpose of overloading it is to provide an array-like interface, not to check bounds. Though that certainly is a correct thing to do. – Xeo Apr 3 '11 at 6:12
    
After doing the above I am getting a lot of error: [link] (cl.ly/5hUN) – Samrat Mazumdar Apr 3 '11 at 6:17
    
@Xeo: An array like interface without bounds checking, whats the use of that? – Alok Save Apr 3 '11 at 6:33
    
@Samrat Mazumdar: You are using gcc to compile a C++ source code. Use g++ and it will compile properly. You can use g++ to compile both C as well as C++ source code and most of the times it will be fine but not vice versa. Heres a codepad link with the above modification, codepad.org/sOLpXE35, it works. – Alok Save Apr 3 '11 at 15:37

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