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For a different question I composed this answer, including this sample code.

In that code I use the mouse wheel to zoom in/out of an HTML5 Canvas. I found some code that normalizes speed differences between Chrome and Firefox. However, the zoom handling in Safari is much, much faster than in either of those.

Here's the code I currently have:

var handleScroll = function(e){
  var delta = e.wheelDelta ? e.wheelDelta/40 : e.detail ? -e.detail/3 : 0;
  if (delta) ...
  return e.preventDefault() && false;
};
canvas.addEventListener('DOMMouseScroll',handleScroll,false); // For Firefox
canvas.addEventListener('mousewheel',handleScroll,false);     // Everyone else

What code can I use to get the same 'delta' value for the same amount of mouse wheel rolling across Chrome v10/11, Firefox v4, Safari v5, Opera v11 and IE9?

This question is related, but has no good answer.

Edit: Further investigation shows that one scroll event 'up' is:

                  | evt.wheelDelta | evt.detail
------------------+----------------+------------
  Safari v5/Win7  |       120      |      0
  Safari v5/OS X  |       120      |      0
  Safari v7/OS X  |        12      |      0
 Chrome v11/Win7  |       120      |      0
 Chrome v37/Win7  |       120      |      0
 Chrome v11/OS X  |         3 (!)  |      0      (possibly wrong)
 Chrome v37/OS X  |       120      |      0
        IE9/Win7  |       120      |  undefined
  Opera v11/OS X  |        40      |     -1
  Opera v24/OS X  |       120      |      0
  Opera v11/Win7  |       120      |     -3
 Firefox v4/Win7  |    undefined   |     -3
 Firefox v4/OS X  |    undefined   |     -1
Firefox v30/OS X  |    undefined   |     -1

Further, using the MacBook trackpad on OS X gives different results even when moving slowly:

  • On Safari and Chrome, the wheelDelta is a value of 3 instead of 120 for mouse wheel.
  • On Firefox the detail is usually 2, sometimes 1, but when scrolling very slowly NO EVENT HANDLER FIRES AT ALL.

So the question is:

What is the best way to differentiate this behavior (ideally without any user agent or OS sniffing)?

share|improve this question
    
Sorry, I deleted my question. I'm writing up an answer right now. Before I get much further, are you talking about the scrolling on Safari on Mac OS X? When you scroll a little, it scrolls a little, but if you keep a constant rate, it progressively gets faster? –  Blender Apr 3 '11 at 5:05
    
@Blender I am testing on OS X right now, and yes, Safari is the outlier which is zooming about 20x faster than Chrome. Unfortunately I don't have a physical mouse attached, so my testing is restricted to two-finger-swipes of ≈equivalent distances and speeds. –  Phrogz Apr 3 '11 at 5:09
    
I've updated the question with details on the behavior of the top 5 browsers across OS X and Win7. It's a minefield, with Chrome on OS X appearing to be the problematic outlier. –  Phrogz Apr 4 '11 at 16:39
    
@Phrogz Shouldn't it be e.wheelDelta/120? –  Šime Vidas Apr 4 '11 at 17:26
    
@ŠimeVidas Yes, the code I copied and was using was clearly wrong. You can see better code in my answer below. –  Phrogz Apr 4 '11 at 17:30

8 Answers 8

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Edit September 2014

Given that:

  • Different versions of the same browser on OS X have yielded different values in the past, and may do so in the future, and that
  • Using the trackpad on OS X yields very similar effects to using a mouse wheel, yet gives very different event values, and yet the device difference cannot be detected by JS

…I can only recommend using this simple, sign-based-counting code:

var handleScroll = function(evt){
  if (!evt) evt = event;
  var direction = (evt.detail<0 || evt.wheelDelta>0) ? 1 : -1;
  // Use the value as you will
};
someEl.addEventListener('DOMMouseScroll',handleScroll,false); // for Firefox
someEl.addEventListener('mousewheel',    handleScroll,false); // for everyone else

Original attempt to be correct follows.

Here is my first attempt at a script to normalize the values. It has two flaws on OS X: Firefox on OS X will produce values 1/3 what they should be, and Chrome on OS X will produce values 1/40 what they should be.

// Returns +1 for a single wheel roll 'up', -1 for a single roll 'down'
var wheelDistance = function(evt){
  if (!evt) evt = event;
  var w=evt.wheelDelta, d=evt.detail;
  if (d){
    if (w) return w/d/40*d>0?1:-1; // Opera
    else return -d/3;              // Firefox;         TODO: do not /3 for OS X
  } else return w/120;             // IE/Safari/Chrome TODO: /3 for Chrome OS X
};

You can test out this code on your own browser here: http://phrogz.net/JS/wheeldelta.html

Suggestions for detecting and improving the behavior on Firefox and Chrome on OS X are welcome.

Edit: One suggestion from @Tom is to simply count each event call as a single move, using the sign of the distance to adjust it. This will not give great results under smooth/accelerated scrolling on OS X, nor handle perfectly cases when the mouse wheel is moved very fast (e.g. wheelDelta is 240), but these happen infrequently. This code is now the recommended technique shown at the top of this answer, for the reasons described there.

share|improve this answer
    
For Windows systems, this should do it: jsfiddle.net/simevidas/FLLJ3 –  Šime Vidas Apr 4 '11 at 17:47
1  
The reader-friendly version is here: jsfiddle.net/simevidas/FLLJ3/1 –  Šime Vidas Apr 4 '11 at 17:51
    
@ŠimeVidas Thanks, that's basically what I have, except that I also account for the 1/3 difference on Opera OS X. –  Phrogz Apr 4 '11 at 17:55
    
@Phrogz, do you have an updated version in Sept' 2014 with all OS X /3 added ? This would be a great addition for community! –  Basj Sep 24 at 22:04
    
@Phrogz, this would be great. I don't have a Mac here to test... (I would be happy to give a bounty for that, even if I don't have much reputation myself ;)) –  Basj Sep 25 at 7:41

Here is my crazy attempt to produce a cross browser coherent and normalized delta ( -1 <= delta <= 1 ) :

var o = e.originalEvent,
    d = o.detail, w = o.wheelDelta,
    n = 225, n1 = n-1;

// Normalize delta
d = d ? w && (f = w/d) ? d/f : -d/1.35 : w/120;
// Quadratic scale if |d| > 1
d = d < 1 ? d < -1 ? (-Math.pow(d, 2) - n1) / n : d : (Math.pow(d, 2) + n1) / n;
// Delta *should* not be greater than 2...
e.delta = Math.min(Math.max(d / 2, -1), 1);

This is totally empirical but works quite good on Safari 6, FF 16, Opera 12 (OS X) and IE 7 on XP

share|improve this answer
2  
If I could upvote another 10 times I could. Thank you so much! –  Norris Mar 16 '13 at 8:50
    
Can you please have the full functional code in a demo (e.g. jsFiddle) ? –  adardesign Apr 22 '13 at 13:42
    
Here it is : jsfiddle.net/uNeBr –  smrtl Jun 24 '13 at 20:52
    
Is there a reason to cache the event-object in o? –  yckart Jul 27 '13 at 10:30
    
Nope there is none. The o variable is there to show we want the original event and not a wrapped event like jQuery or other libraries may pass to event handlers. –  smrtl Jul 29 '13 at 15:33

Another more or less self-contained solution at http://jsbin.com/iqafek/2/edit .

This doesn't take time between events into account though. Some browsers seem to always fire events with the same delta, and just fire them faster when scrolling quickly. Others do vary the deltas. One can imagine an adaptive normalizer that takes time into account, but that'd get somewhat involved and awkward to use.

share|improve this answer
    
This solution doesn't work at all with Chrome on Mac with Trackpad. –  Norris Mar 16 '13 at 8:51
    
@Norris I believe it does now. Just found this question and the example here works on my macbook with chrome –  Harry Moreno Oct 1 '13 at 9:58

For zoom support on touch devices, register for the gesturestart, gesturechange and gestureend events and use the event.scale property. You can see example code for this.

For Firefox 17 the onwheel event is planned to be supported by desktop and mobile versions (as per MDN docs on onwheel). Also for Firefox maybe the Gecko specific MozMousePixelScroll event is useful (although presumably this is now deprecated since the DOMMouseWheel event is now deprecated in Firefox).

For Windows, the driver itself seems to generate the WM_MOUSEWHEEL, WM_MOUSEHWHEEL events (and maybe the WM_GESTURE event for touchpad panning?). That would explain why Windows or the browser doesn't seem to normalise the mousewheel event values itself (and might mean you cannot write reliable code to normalise the values).

For onwheel (not onmousewheel) event support in Internet Explorer for IE9 and IE10, you can also use the W3C standard onwheel event. However one notch can be a value different from 120 (e.g. a single notch becomes 111 (instead of -120) on my mouse using this test page). I wrote another article with other details wheel events that might be relevant.

Basically in my own testing for wheel events (I am trying to normalise the values for scrolling), I have found that I get varying values for OS, browser vendor, browser version, event type, and device (Microsoft tiltwheel mouse, laptop touchpad gestures, laptop touchpad with scrollzone, Apple magic mouse, Apple mighty mouse scrollball, Mac touchpad, etc etc).

And have to ignore a variety of side-effects from browser configuration (e.g. Firefox mousewheel.enable_pixel_scrolling, chrome --scroll-pixels=150), driver settings (e.g. Synaptics touchpad), and OS configuration (Windows mouse settings, OSX Mouse preferences, X.org button settings).

share|improve this answer

I made a table with different values returned by different events/browsers, taking into account the DOM3 wheel event that some browsers already support (table under).

Based on that I made this function to normalize the speed:

http://jsfiddle.net/mfe8J/1/

function normalizeWheelSpeed(event) {
    var normalized;
    if (event.wheelDelta) {
        normalized = (event.wheelDelta % 120 - 0) == -0 ? event.wheelDelta / 120 : event.wheelDelta / 12;
    } else {
        var rawAmmount = event.deltaY ? event.deltaY : event.detail;
        normalized = -(rawAmmount % 3 ? rawAmmount * 10 : rawAmmount / 3);
    }
    return normalized;
}

Table for mousewheel, wheel and DOMMouseScroll events:

| mousewheel        | Chrome (win) | Chrome (mac) | Firefox (win) | Firefox (mac) | Safari 7 (mac) | Opera 22 (mac) | Opera 22 (win) | IE11      | IE 9 & 10   | IE 7 & 8  |
|-------------------|--------------|--------------|---------------|---------------|----------------|----------------|----------------|-----------|-------------|-----------|
| event.detail      | 0            | 0            | -             | -             | 0              | 0              | 0              | 0         | 0           | undefined |
| event.wheelDelta  | 120          | 120          | -             | -             | 12             | 120            | 120            | 120       | 120         | 120       |
| event.wheelDeltaY | 120          | 120          | -             | -             | 12             | 120            | 120            | undefined | undefined   | undefined |
| event.wheelDeltaX | 0            | 0            | -             | -             | 0              | 0              | 0              | undefined | undefined   | undefined |
| event.delta       | undefined    | undefined    | -             | -             | undefined      | undefined      | undefined      | undefined | undefined   | undefined |
| event.deltaY      | -100         | -4           | -             | -             | undefined      | -4             | -100           | undefined | undefined   | undefined |
| event.deltaX      | 0            | 0            | -             | -             | undefined      | 0              | 0              | undefined | undefined   | undefined |
|                   |              |              |               |               |                |                |                |           |             |           |
| wheel             | Chrome (win) | Chrome (mac) | Firefox (win) | Firefox (mac) | Safari 7 (mac) | Opera 22 (mac) | Opera 22 (win) | IE11      | IE 10 & 9   | IE 7 & 8  |
| event.detail      | 0            | 0            | 0             | 0             | -              | 0              | 0              | 0         | 0           | -         |
| event.wheelDelta  | 120          | 120          | undefined     | undefined     | -              | 120            | 120            | undefined | undefined   | -         |
| event.wheelDeltaY | 120          | 120          | undefined     | undefined     | -              | 120            | 120            | undefined | undefined   | -         |
| event.wheelDeltaX | 0            | 0            | undefined     | undefined     | -              | 0              | 0              | undefined | undefined   | -         |
| event.delta       | undefined    | undefined    | undefined     | undefined     | -              | undefined      | undefined      | undefined | undefined   | -         |
| event.deltaY      | -100         | -4           | -3            | -0,1          | -              | -4             | -100           | -99,56    | -68,4 | -53 | -         |
| event.deltaX      | 0            | 0            | 0             | 0             | -              | 0              | 0              | 0         | 0           | -         |
|                   |              |              |               |               |                |                |                |           |             |           |
|                   |              |              |               |               |                |                |                |           |             |           |
| DOMMouseScroll    |              |              | Firefox (win) | Firefox (mac) |                |                |                |           |             |           |
| event.detail      |              |              | -3            | -1            |                |                |                |           |             |           |
| event.wheelDelta  |              |              | undefined     | undefined     |                |                |                |           |             |           |
| event.wheelDeltaY |              |              | undefined     | undefined     |                |                |                |           |             |           |
| event.wheelDeltaX |              |              | undefined     | undefined     |                |                |                |           |             |           |
| event.delta       |              |              | undefined     | undefined     |                |                |                |           |             |           |
| event.deltaY      |              |              | undefined     | undefined     |                |                |                |           |             |           |
| event.deltaX      |              |              | undefined     | undefined     |                |                |                |           |             |           |
share|improve this answer

This is a problem I've been fighting with for some hours today, and not for the first time :(

I've been trying to sum up values over a "swipe" and see how different browsers report values, and they vary a lot, with Safari reporting order of magnitude bigger numbers on almost all platforms, Chrome reporting quite more (like 3 times more) than firefox, firefox being balanced on the long run but quite different among platforms on small movements (on Ubuntu gnome, nearly only +3 or -3, seems like it sums up smaller events and then send a big "+3")

The current solutions found right now are three :

  1. The already mentioned "use only the sign" which kills any kind of acceleration
  2. Sniff the browser up to minor version and platform, and adjust properly
  3. Qooxdoo recently implemented a self adapting algorithm, which basically tries to scale the delta based on minimum and maximum value received so far.

The idea in Qooxdoo is good, and works, and is the only solution I've currently found to be completely consistent cross browser.

Unfortunately it tends to renormalize also the acceleration. If you try it (in their demos), and scroll up and down at maximum speed for a while, you'll notice that scrolling extremely fast or extremely slow basically produce nearly the same amount of movement. On the opposite if you reload the page and only swipe very slowly, you'll notice that it will scroll quite fast".

This is frustrating for a Mac user (like me) used to give vigorous scroll swipes on the touchpad and expecting to get to the top or bottom of the scrolled thing.

Even more, since it scales down the mouse speed based on the maximum value obtained, the more your user tries to speed it up, the more it will slow down, while a "slow scrolling" user will experience quite fast speeds.

This makes this (otherwise brilliant) solution a slightly better implementation of solution 1.

I ported the solution to the jquery mousewheel plugin : http://jsfiddle.net/SimoneGianni/pXzVv/

If you play with it for a while, You'll see that you'll start getting quite homogeneous results, but you'll also notice that it tend to +1/-1 values quite fast.

I'm now working on enhancing it to detect peaks better, so that they don't send everything "out of scale". It would also be nice to also obtain a float value between 0 and 1 as the delta value, so that there is a coherent output.

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There is definitely no simple way to normalize across all users in all OS in all browsers.

It gets worse than your listed variations - on my WindowsXP+Firefox3.6 setup my mousewheel does 6 per one-notch scroll - probably because somewhere I've forgotten I've accelerated the mouse wheel, either in the OS or somewhere in about:config

However I am working on a similar problem (with a similar app btw, but non-canvas) and it occurs to me by just using the delta sign of +1 / -1 and measuring over time the last time it fired, you'll have a rate of acceleration, ie. if someone scrolls once vs several times in a few moments (which I would bet is how google maps does it).

The concept seems to work well in my tests, just make anything less than 100ms add to the acceleration.

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var onMouseWheel = function(e) {
    e = e.originalEvent;
    var delta = e.wheelDelta>0||e.detail<0?1:-1;
    alert(delta);
}
$("body").bind("mousewheel DOMMouseScroll", onMouseWheel);
share|improve this answer

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