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I was thinking about 'power' of HTML5. It can do new and fancy stuff, but older PCs will lag when attempting to render HTML5 heavy web pages! (Like this one).

Is it worth to write pages in HTML5 and step into Web 2.0? Or should I stay with HTML 4, which most PCs can handle? Should I go with "Design & Power" (HTML5) or "Speed" (HTML4)?

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It depends on what kind of application/website you want to create. If you have no need for HTML5 features then you don't have to use it. –  Felix Kling Apr 3 '11 at 9:12

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The difference between HTML 4 and HTML 5 is not binary.

If you use HTML 5 you don't have to use all of HTML 5, and you don't have to do things that require lots of CPU.

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That page doesn't lag because it's written in HTML5. It's lagging because it has a lot of JS and CSS3 usage.

You can still use HTML5 markup to create light web pages.

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HTML5 does not mean heavy pages, it depends on how you use it, the mozilla demos are made to impress on the reaches of html5 but it doesnt mean every page will be that heavy.

What comes with html5 is a set of new features for easier and more powerful web development it is up to you how to and when to use it.

This is a myth: “My Browser Supports HTML5, but Yours Doesn’t”

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It's the same issue as with IE vs. all other browsers. People will just have to upgrade in order to use the Web as it should be used in 2011 and not as twenty years ago. It's just the nature of development.

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Not really, some thing won't change like older PC's won't update their power itself. –  Robik Apr 3 '11 at 9:13
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Not themselves, but their owners should. It's a poor comparison, but it's a close one. –  Adrian Marinica Apr 3 '11 at 9:16
    
I disagree - I believe internet should deliver content in flexible manner, so that you can render page via text based browser, or powerful feature rich computer. 90% of the time, people can access from powerful computer, but sometimes there are circumstance where this is inappropriate or inconvenient. Sixth sense project for example - will use a very small device to give access to information on the internet and bring it to you as augmented reality. Other example is visually impaired people using screen readers, and sometimes old machines that it is hard to make a change from. –  Billy Moon Apr 3 '11 at 9:19

HTML5 itself does not take more time to render. Some web2.0 features might use more processing power. You need to gauge the hardware of your target audience. For example, in africa, most people use mobile phones as their primary exposure to the internet.

If you want to be really thorough - you can make a simple alternative to a sophisticated site, and cover all bases.

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I write most of my webpages in HTML5,

It depends if the website you are designing is going to be updated alot, or just a 2-3 page website which is a one off design. If it a one off design I would do HTML5 so the webpage will be standard in 10-15 years time.

If however you feel more comfortable and wouldn't mind updating your website at a later date do (X)HTML4 or however you code.

Personally, I think it is personal choice but from where I am standing I would use it. In all my designs the load times haven't distracted anyone from not coming to the site, and in the long run it will save you time.

You can also use HTML5 google shiv, for IE support, hope this helps you and good luck!

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