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Why this doesn't work in GCC 4.5.1

#include <iostream>  
#include <type_traits>
#include <limits.h>//for INT_MIN
#include <typeinfo>
using namespace std;

#ifdef _MSC_VER
#define UNIVERSAL_INT_MAX LLONG_MAX
#define UNIVERSAL_INT_MIN LLONG_MIN
#endif

#ifdef __GNUC__
#define UNIVERSAL_INT_MAX LONG_LONG_MAX  
#define UNIVERSAL_INT_MIN LONG_LONG_MIN
#endif
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    cout << UNIVERSAL_INT_MAX << '\n';
    return 0;
}

Error I'm getting:

"main.cpp|24|error: 'LONG_LONG_MAX' was not declared in this scope"  

EDIT

#ifdef __GNUC__
#define UNIVERSAL_INT_MAX ( ( 1ULL << numeric_limits< long long >::digits ) - 1 )
#define UNIVERSAL_INT_MAX_plus_three (UNIVERSAL_INT_MAX + 3)
#endif
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    cout << UNIVERSAL_INT_MAX << '\n';
    cout << "Huhh?: " << UNIVERSAL_INT_MAX_plus_three << '\n';
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Do you compile with a -std=xxx option, where xxx supports long long? –  Bo Persson Apr 3 '11 at 12:10
    
@Bo yep........ –  There is nothing we can do Apr 3 '11 at 12:15
    
Again, if you need a compile time constant, state it in the question rather than letting others answer. It is not like this is the first time you ask for different variations of the same thing and fail to provide a complete question. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Apr 3 '11 at 15:03

3 Answers 3

long long is nonstandard so LONG_LONG_MAX is nonstandard.

Better to use the C++ mechanism numeric_limits< long long >::max(), which is in <limits>.

long long is still nonstandard, but if the compiler implements it, this is guaranteed to work.

EDIT: You can achieve the same thing as a compile-time constant using

( ( 1ULL << numeric_limits< long long >::digits ) - 1 )
share|improve this answer
    
care to elaborate on that trick? It's interesting, but I can't convince myself it's truly portable from a quick read. –  Flexo Apr 3 '11 at 12:09
    
@Potatoswatter need compile-time constant –  There is nothing we can do Apr 3 '11 at 12:09
    
@There: Reload the page ;v) –  Potatoswatter Apr 3 '11 at 12:10
    
@awoodland: This assumes that long long is a signed, binary type and unsigned long long exists and has literals ending ULL. So no, it's not perfectly portable, but it's at least better than outright assuming the value is 2^63 - 1. –  Potatoswatter Apr 3 '11 at 12:13
    
@Potatoswatter that's cool, and what about min? –  There is nothing we can do Apr 3 '11 at 12:17

Since this is C++ why not use std::numeric_liimts?

#include <limits>
#include <iostream>

int main() {
   std::cout << std::numeric_limits<int>::max() << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I need compile time constants –  There is nothing we can do Apr 3 '11 at 12:01

Try LLONG_MAX: it's as non-standard as long long, but it's compile-time

share|improve this answer
    
@Ronald no go, unfortunately. –  There is nothing we can do Apr 3 '11 at 12:20
1  
and why is that a no go? your installation doesn't have it? your preproc defs hide it? –  rlc Apr 3 '11 at 12:22
    
@Ronald I've tried and I'm getting the same error as with LONG_LONG_MAX - undefined - but I don't understand this because both these "definitions" are defined in limits.h in GCC. –  There is nothing we can do Apr 3 '11 at 14:25
1  
OK, in that case, your preproc defs are hiding it. My G++ (4.4.3) accepts your code without problem. –  rlc Apr 3 '11 at 14:31
    
In limits.h, it seems to define LLONG_MAX to __LONG_LONG_MAX__ Have you tried that one? –  rlc Apr 3 '11 at 14:31

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