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In order to make my code shorter and easier to change I want to replace something like

enum{ E_AAA, E_BBB, E_CCC };
static const char *strings{"AAA", "BBB", "CCC" };

With a macro, like INIT(AAA, BBB, CCC); but when I try doing a macro with variable arguments, and stringification I get an error as the arguments are not declared.

Any idea on how to do this?

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3  
How exactly does your macro look like? –  Xeo Apr 3 '11 at 14:44
    
Take a look at Boost.Preprocessor, it is ugly (due to limitations of the cpp) but it povides means to write macros that operate on sequences. –  Begemoth Apr 3 '11 at 14:46
1  
Sounds like you forgot quotes when outputting the strings definition. Also, can you pick a language please: C or C++? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 3 '11 at 14:46

7 Answers 7

Here a solution I learned a few days ago. The simplified version that attends your question is:

#define ENUM_MACRO(name, v1, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6, v7)\
    enum name { v1, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6, v7};\
    const char *name##Strings[] = { #v1, #v2, #v3, #v4, #v5, #v6, #v7};

ENUM_MACRO(Week, Sun, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri, Sat);

But you can have an improved version, with a function call, like this:

#define ENUM_MACRO(name, v1, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6, v7)\
    enum name { v1, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6, v7};\
    const char *name##Strings[] = { #v1, #v2, #v3, #v4, #v5, #v6, #v7};\
    const char *name##ToString(value) { return name##Strings[value]; }

ENUM_MACRO(Week, Sun, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri, Sat);

This will grow to be:

  enum Week { Sun, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri, Sat}; 
  const char *WeekStrings[] = { "Sun", "Mon", "Tue", "Wed", "Thu", "Fri", "Sat"}; 
  const char *WeekToString(value) { return WeekStrings[value]; };

You can even use an offset for the first element, like this one:

#define ENUM_MACRO(name, offset, v1, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6, v7)\
    enum name { v1 =  offset, v2, v3, v4, v5, v6, v7};\
    const char *name##Strings[] = { #v1, #v2, #v3, #v4, #v5, #v6, #v7};\
    const char *name##ToString(value) { return name##Strings[value - offset ]; }

ENUM_MACRO(Week, 1, Sun, Mon, Tue, Wed, Thu, Fri, Sat);

I hope this helps.

Take care, Beco

Reference:

Print the month question, by Kush, answer by Danny Varod

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Please, moderator, remove the CW flag. Thank you. –  Dr Beco Apr 3 '11 at 17:30
    
Removed. –  Tim Post Apr 3 '11 at 17:31

One way to do this is with X-Macros, which are basically a way to define a macro which is then used for generating more complex structures than a simple macro easily allows. Here is an example of doing exactly what you are asking.

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+1 I was just writing this, but you found an already existing example :) –  digEmAll Apr 3 '11 at 14:52

You can do it with a bit of macro magic:

#define FRUITS \
    etype(Unknown), \
    etype(Apple),   \
    etype(Orange),  \
    etype(Banana),  \
    etype(Apricot), \
    etype(Mango)

#define etype(x) F_##x

typedef enum { FRUITS } Fruit;

#undef etype
#define etype(x) #x

static const char *strFruit[] = { FRUITS };

Here is a test program:

#include <iostream>
#include <exception>
#include <vector>

#define FRUITS \
    etype(Unknown), \
    etype(Apple),   \
    etype(Orange),  \
    etype(Banana),  \
    etype(Apricot), \
    etype(Mango)

#define etype(x) F_##x

typedef enum { FRUITS } Fruit;

#undef etype
#define etype(x) #x

static const char *strFruit[] = { FRUITS };

const char *enum2str (Fruit f)
{
    return strFruit[static_cast<int>(f)];
}

Fruit str2enum (const char *f)
{
    const int n = sizeof(strFruit) / sizeof(strFruit[0]);
    for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    {
        if (strcmp(strFruit[i], f) == 0)
            return (Fruit) i;
    }
    return F_Unknown;
}

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
    std::cout << "I like " << enum2str(F_Mango) << std::endl;
    std::cout << "I do not like " << enum2str(F_Banana) << std::endl;
    std::vector<char *> v;
    v.push_back("Apple");
    v.push_back("Mango");
    v.push_back("Tomato");
    for (int i = 0; i < v.size(); ++i)
    {
        const Fruit f = str2enum(v[i]);
        if (f == F_Unknown)
            std::cout << "Is " << v[i] << " a fruit?" << std::endl;
        else
            std::cout << v[i] << " is a fruit" << std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

It outputs:

I like Mango
I do not like Banana
Apple is a fruit
Mango is a fruit
Is Tomato a fruit?
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I like this, but I found a similar but cleaner way here: stackoverflow.com/a/238157/599142 –  tr3w Jul 13 '12 at 16:14

Here is a solution with Boost.Preprocessor:

#include <boost/preprocessor.hpp>

#define DEFINE_ENUM_DECL_VAL(r, name, val) BOOST_PP_CAT(name, BOOST_PP_CAT(_, val))
#define DEFINE_ENUM_VAL_STR(r, name, val) BOOST_PP_STRINGIZE(val)
#define DEFINE_ENUM(name, val_seq)                                                 \
  enum name {                                                                      \
    BOOST_PP_SEQ_ENUM(BOOST_PP_SEQ_TRANSFORM(DEFINE_ENUM_DECL_VAL, name, val_seq)) \
  };                                                                               \
  static const char* BOOST_PP_CAT(name, _strings) {                                \
    BOOST_PP_SEQ_ENUM(BOOST_PP_SEQ_TRANSFORM(DEFINE_ENUM_VAL_STR, name, val_seq)) \
  };

DEFINE_ENUM(E, (AAA)(BBB)(CCC))

(AAA)(BBB)(CCC) is a Boost.Preprocessor sequence of tree elements AAA, BBB and CCC.

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One way to handle this is to define a list macro, i.e. something that expands to another macro that is left for the user to define. For example:

#define MY_LIST MY_ENTRY(AAA) MY_ENTRY(BBB) MY_ENTRY(CCC)

To define the enum:

#define MY_ENTRY(x) E_##x,
enum name
{
  MY_LIST
  NUMBER_OF_ELEMENTS    /* Needed to eat trailing comma (not needed in C99, but in C++) */
};
#undef MY_ENTRY

To define the string:

#define MY_ENTRY(x) #x,
static const char *strings[] = { MY_LIST };
#undef MY_ENTRY

Personally, I find this much easier to work with than the X macro, as this does not rely in include-file magic.

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Trailing commas are totally fine in enums. –  Xeo Apr 3 '11 at 16:11
    
I had the check the standards, in C99 they're OK (which was news to me -- thanks). However, they are not accepted by neither C89 nor C++ (1998). –  Lindydancer Apr 3 '11 at 16:26
    
You're right, Comeau Online also rejects trailing comma in C++03 strict mode. :) Just ignore my previous comment then. –  Xeo Apr 3 '11 at 16:32
    
Looks like you just found a problem with the Comeau compiler, C++03 should accept a trailing comma, according to the draft. –  Lindydancer Apr 3 '11 at 17:07
    
@Lindydancer: C++03 should not accept a trailing comma, according to the published standard. –  Mike Seymour Apr 3 '11 at 17:40

For a simple solution, I'd recommend something like X-Macros.

For a more complex solution that adds several other features (like range checking, enhanced type safety, optional associated data, etc.), there's a proposed (but never finalized) Boost.Enum library.

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Here is my solution:

#define FRUITS(fruit) \
  fruit(Apple)        \
  fruit(Orange)       \
  fruit(Banana)       

#define CREATE_ENUM(name) \
  F_##name,

#define CREATE_STRINGS(name) \
  #name,

The trick is that 'fruit' is an argument of the macro 'FRUITS' and will be replaced by what ever you pass to. For example:

FRUITS(CREATE_ENUM)

will expand to this:

F_Apple, F_Orange, F_Banana, 

Lets create the enum and the string array:

enum fruit {
  FRUITS(CREATE_ENUM)
};

const char* fruit_names[] = {
  FRUITS(CREATE_STRINGS)
};
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