Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have tried to understand but still not sure. If there is a constructor in the base class, the derived classes will always call it? I know they can override it (not correct term here, I know - I mean add code to their constructors) but I assume if the constructor is defined in the base class, the derived ones will always call it. Is that true?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, if there is a parameterless constructor it will always be called. If there is more than one constructor, you can choose which one to call with the base keyword:

class Parent {
    public Parent() {}
    public Parent(int x) {}
}

class Child : Parent {
    public Child(int x) : base(x) {
    }
}

If there is no parameterless constructor, you will be forced to do this:

class Parent {
    public Parent(int x) {}
}

class Child : Parent {
    // This will not compile without "base(x)"
    public Child(int x) : base(x) {
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Not sure I get it. In the first example, there is Child(int x): base(x) so I guess both will be called? –  Miria Apr 3 '11 at 15:35
    
@Miria: Yes. There is no way that some base constructor will not be called (e.g. in the second example the compiler will not let you remove base(x)); using base just allows you to choose which one will be called, and with what parameters. –  Jon Apr 3 '11 at 15:42

If there is only a parameterless constructor in the base class, the child class constructor will always call it first. On the other hand if you have other constructors defined in the base class, then the child class will have an option which base constructor to call.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.