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I was asked a question in yestoday's interview:

How do you reverse a <li> list efficiently?

for example, if there is a list:

<ul id="list">
    <li>1</li>
    <li>2</li>
    ...
    <li>10000</li>
</ul>

then after the reverse, the list would look like:

<ul id="list">
    <li>10000</li>
    ...
    <li>2</li>
    <li>1</li>
</ul>

The most efficient code I can come up with is this:

function reverse(){
    var list = document.getElementById("list");
    var node_list = list.childNodes;
    var fragment = document.createDocumentFragment();
    for(var i=node_list.length-1; i>=0; i--){
       fragment.appendChild(node_list[i]);
    }
    list.appendChild(fragment);
}

But it's still really slow(takes about 10s in Chrome). Any idea?

UPDATE:
I think there is something wrong with my Chrome... I installed a Chromium and tested the code above in it, it takes less a second.

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7  
If I answer correctly, do I get the job? –  uosɐſ Apr 3 '11 at 15:21
    
How did you do the actual reversal? –  Gumbo Apr 3 '11 at 15:21
2  
I would not do, because I suppose there is no real scenario when 10000 li required at single page. :) –  Waqas Raja Apr 3 '11 at 15:24
1  
So that's one millisecond per li. How much faster do you want it to be? –  BoltClock Apr 3 '11 at 15:29
3  
in a real world scenario(like Raja says) there's something wrong with the team/company if they plan to sort the lis that way. There are other ways to sort(and present that much information) –  corroded Apr 3 '11 at 15:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I guess the point of the interview question basically is the fact that innerHTML is way faster than any DOM operation in every browser. So, don't use DocumentFragment, use a simple string instead:

var ul = document.getElementById("list");
var lstLi = ul.childNodes;

var str = '';

for (var i=lstLi.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
    str += '<li>' + lstLi[i].innerHTML + '</li>';
}
ul.innerHTML = str;

http://jsfiddle.net/bKeuD/

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1  
The downside to this method, is that you are losing the event attach to those element and you aren't copying the attributes. In most case, your method will do the job, but if you need to keep the element in the same state, you need to go with a method like what I proposed below. –  HoLyVieR Apr 3 '11 at 19:09
    
@Holyvier: Agreed. That's definitely something you should mention in an interview ;) –  Pumbaa80 Apr 3 '11 at 19:28
    
Hi, thanks for your answer. I tested it in jsfiddle and it's really fast.However, if I wrap the code in a function called reverse, and add a button to the page, bind it's onclick event listener to reverse, then it will take about 2 second for the reverse.How could this happen? –  wong2 Apr 4 '11 at 11:03
    
@wong2 I don't know how that could happen. In this example everything works as fast as before –  Pumbaa80 Apr 5 '11 at 5:59

The way the DOM work, you don't need to re-create the zone. All you need to do is move your element inside the ul that already exist. An optimal solution would be something along this :

var ul = document.getElementById("lstLi");
var lstLi = ul.childNodes;

for (var i=0, c = lstLi.length; i < c; i++) {
    ul.insertBefore(lstLi[i], ul.firstChild);
}

Basicly what this does is that it iterate over each element an put them in first. In the end your list will be reversed.

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oh, this makes my Chrome crashed... –  wong2 Apr 3 '11 at 17:05
    
@wong2 That's wierd because I tested it in Chrome. You can test it here. –  HoLyVieR Apr 3 '11 at 17:11
    
@HoLyVieR The point of the question is that there are 10000 lis... –  wong2 Apr 3 '11 at 17:13
    
@wong2 There is something wrong with your script, on my side it works without crashing. Demo : jsfiddle.net/WsxnR/1 . It takes around 500ms to perform the reverse. –  HoLyVieR Apr 3 '11 at 17:32
    
@HoLyVieR Maybe you can try it on your local system? –  wong2 Apr 3 '11 at 17:55

You can do it this way:

var list = document.getElementsByTagName("ul")[0],
    items = list.childNodes,
    itemsLen = items.length;

while (itemsLen--) {
  list.appendChild(items[itemsLen]);
}

Test: http://jsbin.com/ohegu4/2/edit

And if your problem is that you don’t want to block the browser, you can do that:

var list = document.getElementsByTagName("ul")[0],
    items = list.childNodes,
    itemsLen = items.length;

(function reversePart() {
  var iterations = 10; // Number of processed elements every 100ms
  window.setTimeout(function(){
    while (iterations-- && itemsLen--) {
      list.appendChild(items[itemsLen]);
    }
    if (itemsLen) {
      reversePart();
    }
  }, 100); // Delay between each process : 100ms
})();

Test (with 100000 li, yeah!): http://jsbin.com/ubugi3/2/edit

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1  
+1 for the non blocking function –  Liviu T. Apr 3 '11 at 18:12

Pumbaa80's string-based method is the fastest way I found to reverse the list. But just in case you really want to reverse it using DOM methods (e.g. you don't want to lose the attributes of the list items), you can do it this way:

function reverseDom(){
  var list = document.getElementById('list');
  var items = list.childNodes;
  var length = items.length;
  var item0 = items[0];
  var i;
  list.style.display = 'none';
  for(i = 0; i < length - 1; i++)
  {
      list.insertBefore(list.lastChild, item0);
  }
  list.style.display = 'block';
}

In Google Chrome in Linux, the method above took about a second to reverse a 10,000 item list. But Pumbaa80's method is faster. You can compare the two methods side by side on the same list if you go to this link: http://jsbin.com/ubugi3/6

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