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throwing exceptions of objects on the stack, mem leak with new?

Do you throw exceptions in C++ with or without the new operator? Because both of these would throw an exception.

void KillUnicorns()
{
    throw IllegalActionException();
}

int main()
{
    try
    {
        KillUnicorns();
    }
    catch (IllegalActionException e)
    {
         // Handle exception
    }
    return 0;
}

Although the following example would leak memory?

void KillUnicorns()
{
    throw new IllegalActionException();
}

int main()
{
    try
    {
        KillUnicorns();
    }
    catch (IllegalActionException* e)
    {
         // Handle exception
    }
    return 0;
}

What's the right way to throw exceptions in C++?

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marked as duplicate by KennyTM, Hans Passant, Jon, Bo Persson, ChrisF Apr 3 '11 at 16:43

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

I would throw exception without using new:

void KillUnicorns()
{
    throw IllegalActionException();
}

And would catch it with const reference, as:

catch (const IllegalActionException & e)
{   // ^^^^ note const             ^^ note reference!

}

It avoids copy. It avoids new, and so saves you from using delete.

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1  
One quick question asside. Does const IllegalActionException &e achieve the same result as IllegalActionException const& e? As seen in @Martin's comment. –  Kevin Apr 3 '11 at 16:02
    
@Kevin: Yes they're exactly same! –  Nawaz Apr 3 '11 at 16:03
2  
@ Kevin: prefixing or postfing the cosnt to a type is a matter of style (you can see both around). The result is identical. –  Loki Astari Apr 3 '11 at 16:23

Technically you can do both.

But it more traditional to throw objects:
Also note catch by const reference (this prevents slicing of the exception)

try
{
    KillUnicorns();
}
catch (IllegalActionException const& e)
{                         // ^^^^^^^^
     // Handle exception
}
share|improve this answer
5  
+1. Just to add, memory is usually set aside for exception objects. If you do dynamic allocation then you're using that memory for the pointer, but still attempting bog-standard dynamic allocation (on "the heap", if your implementation uses one). If the cause of the exception is that you're out of memory, this is ... not great. Also of course you're creating a mess for yourself w.r.t. freeing up that memory later. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Apr 3 '11 at 16:03

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