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I want to make this method called RegisterCollection with the purpose of registering a collection of subobjects in a DomainObject. The idea is that i want to register collections in a list, so that when i call Save() on my DomainObject, it will call save on each of the registered collections sub domainobjects.

I've made this code, but i get this error when i build: Argument type 'OrderCollection' is not assignable to parameter type Collection.

I use C# with .Net 3.5. I've read somewhere that the type of conversion that fails, is supported in .NET 4.0. Not sure this is correctly understood, but anyway, i hope someone has some suggestions to what else to do or have a workaround.

Is this possible maybe with a CommandPattern of some sort?

public interface IDomainObject
{
    void Save();
}

public class DomainObject : IDomainObject
{
    private readonly IList<Collection<IDomainObject>> m_Collections = new List<Collection<IDomainObject>>();

    protected void RegisterCollection(Collection<IDomainObject> collection)
    {
        m_Collections.Add(collection);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Saves this instance collections.
    /// </summary>
    public virtual void Save()
    {
        SaveCollections();
    }

    private void SaveCollections()
    {
        foreach (var itemCollection in m_Collections)
        {
            foreach (var item in itemCollection)
            {
                item.Save();
            }
        }
    }

}

public class OrderCollection : Collection<IOrder>
{

}

public interface IOrder : IDomainObject
{
}

public class Customer : DomainObject
{
    private readonly OrderCollection m_OrderCollection = new OrderCollection();

    public Customer()
    {
        // Throws: Argument type 'OrderCollection' is not assignable to parameter type Collection<IDomainObject>
        RegisterCollection(m_OrderCollection);
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

Your problem is that Collection<IOrder>is not compatable with Collection<IDomainObject> , this is down to Covariance and Contravariance .

Imagine your collection of IOrder, if it was treated as a list of IDomainObject, then that would allow you to add any IDomainObject to the list, this means i could add an ISomethingElse as long as it derived from IDomainObject, clearly this would be a bad thing..

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I see your point. However, can you come up with an alternative solution to my problem, a solution that still allows me to maintain a list of genericcollections. –  Jonas Mølgaard Apr 4 '11 at 15:07

Do you have to maintain a List of Collections or can you replace it with a simple List of IDomainObject?

If so, you could just make RegisterCollection generic:

private readonly IList<IDomainObject> m_Collections = new List<IDomainObject>();

protected void RegisterCollection<T>(Collection<T> collection) where T : IDomainObject {
  foreach (var obj in collection)
    m_Collections.Add(obj);
}

Thanks to type inference, you won't have to specify T and can call RegisterCollection with any Collection of classes that derive from IDomainObject.

EDIT: Ok, I understand now why you want to keep the list. Another solution I can think of is to create a custom Collection class with a non-generic base class:

public abstract class DomainObjectCollection {
    public abstract void Save();
}

public class DomainObjectCollection<T> : DomainObjectCollection where T : IDomainObject {
    private readonly Collection<T> collection;

    public DomainObjectCollection(Collection<T> collection) {
        this.collection = collection;
    }

    public static implicit operator DomainObjectCollection<T> (Collection<T> collection) {
        return new DomainObjectCollection<T>(collection);
    }

    public override void Save() {
        foreach (var obj in collection)
            obj.Save();
    }
}

public class DomainObject : IDomainObject {
    private readonly IList<DomainObjectCollection> m_Collections = new List<DomainObjectCollection>();

    protected void RegisterCollection<T>(Collection<T> collection) where T : IDomainObject {
        m_Collections.Add((DomainObjectCollection<T>)collection);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Saves this instance collections.
    /// </summary>
    public virtual void Save() {
        SaveCollections();
    }

    private void SaveCollections() {
        foreach (var itemCollection in m_Collections) {
            itemCollection.Save();
        }
    }

}
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Because i wish to call Save() later on, i have to maintain a list of collections. Using your suggestion i will end up with a snapshot of the items in the collection at the time Registercollection was called, and thus miss objects added inbetween Registercollection and Save call. Hope this makes sense? Anyway thanks for your suggestion and efford. –  Jonas Mølgaard Apr 6 '11 at 17:21
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I think i've found a way around. It's not pretty, but it's working. Let me know what you think. Suggestions are most welcome.

Notice i've used some of your suggestion Enzi for RegisterCollection.

This allows me to keep the SaveCollections generic and add more collections at runtime.

public class DomainObject : IDomainObject
{
    private readonly IList<IList> m_Collections = new List<IList>();

    protected void RegisterCollection<T>(List<T> collection) where T : IDomainObject
    {
        m_Collections.Add(collection);
    }

    public int Id { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Saves this instance collections.
    /// </summary>
    public virtual void Save()
    {
        SaveCollections();
    }

    private void SaveCollections()
    {
        foreach (var itemCollection in m_Collections)
        {
            foreach (var item in itemCollection))
            {
                ((IDomainObject)item).Save();
            }
        }
    }        
}


public interface IDomainObject
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Gets or sets the id.
    /// </summary>
    /// <value>
    /// The id.
    /// </value>
    int Id { get; set; }

    /// <summary>
    /// Saves this instance.
    /// </summary>
    void Save();

    /// <summary>
    /// Deletes this instance.
    /// </summary>
    void Delete();
}
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Edited above to reflect a better solution. Hope it can be of some use to others. –  Jonas Mølgaard Apr 22 '11 at 9:29

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