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Remove from the array elements that are repeated. in Ruby

I would like to do this:

my_array = [1, 1, 2, 2, 3]
my_array_without_duplicates = [3]

calling my_array.uniq will give me [1, 2, 3], which is not the result I want. Is there an efficient way of doing this? What I am doing right now is too ugly to post.

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this isn't valid ruby syntax - do you mean [], not {}? –  Peter Apr 3 '11 at 19:14
    
Yes I've changed to []. Speed typing FTL. –  David Apr 3 '11 at 19:15
    
+1 nice question though –  Peter Apr 3 '11 at 19:15
    
do you required the original order to be preserved? –  tokland Apr 3 '11 at 19:33
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marked as duplicate by fl00r, Mladen Jablanović, Michael Kohl, the Tin Man, Andrew Grimm Apr 4 '11 at 0:12

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
my_array.group_by{|e| e}.select{|k,v| v.count == 1}.keys

or

my_array.select{|e| my_array.count(e) == 1}

BTW, you probably meant my_array = [1, 1, 2, 2, 3] (with brackets, not braces).

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+1 for the second option (first one isn't as clean). –  Peter Apr 3 '11 at 19:16
    
Awesome, thanks! –  David Apr 3 '11 at 19:17
    
@Peter: I have a feeling that the first would perform better in most cases, but yes, the latter is cleaner. –  Mladen Jablanović Apr 3 '11 at 19:19
    
Isn't the second O(n^2)? –  tokland Apr 3 '11 at 19:38
    
@tokland: yes, as soon as performance was an issue you would want to reconsider. But until then, I like the elegance of the first solution. –  Peter Apr 3 '11 at 19:48
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I'd get first the histogram of the input (see Enumerable#frequency or write your own) and then do the select:

require 'facets'
xs = [1, 1, 2, 2, 3]
fs = xs.frequency # {1=>2, 2=>2, 3=>1}
ys = xs.select { |x| fs[x] == 1 } # [3]

Ruby 1.9 keeps order in hashes, so this would probably suffice:

xs.frequency.select { |x, count| count == 1 }.keys # [3]

Which can be written in one step if you use the Enumerable#map_select abstraction (and assuming you have no nils in the input), like this:

xs.frequency.map_select { |x, count| x if count == 1 } # [3]
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I believe this has well balance of simplicity and efficiency. Just that it looks long because the variable names are long.

my_array_without_duplicate = my_array.dup
my_array_without_duplicate.each_with_index {|e, i|
    my_array_without_duplicate.delete(e) if my_array_without_dupliate.index(e, i+1)}
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