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I have two pages:

index.php:

<?php
    $mtime = microtime();
    $mtime = explode(" ",$mtime);
    $mtime = $mtime[1] + $mtime[0];
    $starttime = $mtime;
    $text = '
    <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
    <html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
    <head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
    <title>Untitled Document</title>
    </head>
      <body>
        html content
      </body>
    </html>';
    echo $text;
    $mtime = microtime();
    $mtime = explode(" ",$mtime);
    $mtime = $mtime[1] + $mtime[0];
    $endtime = $mtime;
    $totaltime = ($endtime - $starttime);
    echo "This page was created in ".$totaltime." seconds";
?>

and index2.php:

<?php
   $mtime = microtime();
   $mtime = explode(" ",$mtime);
   $mtime = $mtime[1] + $mtime[0];
   $starttime = $mtime;
?>
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Strict//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<title>Untitled Document</title>
</head>

<body>
<?php echo 'html content'; ?>
</body>
</html> 
<?php
   $mtime = microtime();
   $mtime = explode(" ",$mtime);
   $mtime = $mtime[1] + $mtime[0];
   $endtime = $mtime;
   $totaltime = ($endtime - $starttime);
   echo "This page was created in ".$totaltime." seconds";
?>

Test result for index.php:

html content This page was created in 6.1988830566406E-5 seconds

and for index2.php:

html contentThis page was created in 6.4849853515625E-5 seconds

Why HTML embed in PHP is faster than index2.php?

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10  
This is not a proper way of measuring a program's performance, unless you averaged this over thousands of runs. And even then it's unlikely to ever matter since the HTML you're generating is trivial. –  larsmans Apr 3 '11 at 20:09
1  
it's don't see much dfference n speed here –  fazo Apr 3 '11 at 20:09
3  
How many times have you run this test? We're talking about a time difference of 0.0000029s here, so for all intents and purposes, they're running at the same speed. –  Karl Nicoll Apr 3 '11 at 20:12
1  
@utopia: collect representative inputs, run it multiple times on this input on an otherwise unused machine, discard the first run (since it will have to be loaded from disk), get average and standard deviation. Do the same for a purported optimized version and use a t-test if the means are very similar or the standard deviation is high. Use a profiler to see which parts of the program consume how much time relative to total running time. –  larsmans Apr 3 '11 at 20:14
1  
The results are useless. You can assume, that they both running at the same speed and start thinking about more ineresting problems. –  KingCrunch Apr 3 '11 at 20:22
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2 Answers

This isn't really an answer, but I have to wonder why you think this is important? (If you're worried about optimising things to this level, then I suspect PHP may not be the ideal language.)

In essence, code legibility, consistency and anything that will aid long term maintenance is of way more importance than such micro-optimisation and if you are experiencing performance issues, I'd happily place a large quantity of money on the fact that it won't be anything to do how the HTML is being output/whether or not your popping in and out of PHP code blocks a lot.

As such, if you're having performance issues, profile the code to find out where the problems lie - don't waste time worrying about what's "best" - in this case the "best" solution is whatever's easiest for the programmer(s) working on the project.

share|improve this answer
    
I want to walk in right way, not way that our developer show me... –  utopia Apr 3 '11 at 20:21
2  
That's perfect and the only possible answer. There is no rule saying that answer ought to be only literal and positive. –  Your Common Sense Apr 3 '11 at 20:23
1  
@utopia - Efficiency isn't the best way of choosing which path to take. The question should be: "How am I most comfortable working" and "what technique best suits my current situation". If you spend too long fussing over things like 2.9E-6 time differences, you won't get any actual coding done. In your example, I would choose the second code sample, simply for the fact that it allows you to more easily edit the code without worrying about escaping quotes and the like. –  Karl Nicoll Apr 3 '11 at 20:35
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I think it's caused by switching between php and html mode.

But there is no significal difference in run times...

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