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I'm designing a multilingual application using .resx files.

I have a few files like GlobalStrings.resx, GlobalStrings.es.resx, GlobalStrings.en.resx, etc. When I want to use this, I just need to set Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture.

The problem: I have a combobox with all the available languages, but I'm loading this manually:

comboLanguage.Items.Add(CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo("en"));
comboLanguage.Items.Add(CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo("es"));

I've tried with

cmbLanguage.Items.AddRange(CultureInfo.GetCultures(CultureTypes.UserCustomCulture));

without any success. Also tried with all the elements in CultureTypes, but I'm only getting a big list with a lot more languages that I'm not using, or an empty list.

Is there any way to get only the supported languages?

share|improve this question

You can programatically list the cultures available in your application

// Pass the class name of your resources as a parameter e.g. MyResources for MyResources.resx
ResourceManager rm = new ResourceManager(typeof(MyResources));

CultureInfo[] cultures = CultureInfo.GetCultures(CultureTypes.AllCultures);
foreach (CultureInfo culture in cultures)
{
    try
    {
        ResourceSet rs = rm.GetResourceSet(culture, true, false);
        // or ResourceSet rs = rm.GetResourceSet(new CultureInfo(culture.TwoLetterISOLanguageName), true, false);
        string isSupported = (rs == null) ? " is not supported" : " is supported";
        Console.WriteLine(culture + isSupported);
    }
    catch (CultureNotFoundException exc)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(culture + " is not available on the machine or is an invalid culture identifier.");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Note that GlobalStrings.resx will be detected under InvariantCulture. – Hans Jul 18 '14 at 23:20
4  
Won't this essentially force load all satellite assemblies? – Taylor Buchanan Jan 20 '15 at 18:26
    
@TaylorBuchanan could probably call ReleaseAllResources after that (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…) and then load the specific resource again – George Birbilis Aug 21 '15 at 17:39

I'm not sure about getting the languages, maybe you can scan your installation folder for dll-files, but setting your language to an unsupported language should not be a problem.

.NET will fallback to the culture neutral resources if no culture specific files can be found so you can safely select unsupported languages.

As long as you control the application yourself you could just store the available languages in a application setting somewhere. Just a comma-separated string with the culture names should suffice: "en, es"

share|improve this answer

This would be one of solution on basis of following statement:
Each satellite assembly for a specific language is named the same but lies in a sub-folder named after the specific culture e.g. fr or fr-CA.

public IEnumerable<CultureInfo> GetSupportedCulture()
{
    //Get all culture 
    CultureInfo[] culture = CultureInfo.GetCultures(CultureTypes.AllCultures);

    //Find the location where application installed.
    string exeLocation = Path.GetDirectoryName(Uri.UnescapeDataString(new UriBuilder(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().CodeBase).Path));

    //Return all culture for which satellite folder found with culture code.
    return culture.Where(cultureInfo => Directory.Exists(Path.Combine(exeLocation, cultureInfo.Name)));
}
share|improve this answer
    
This solution works on my ASP.net MVC project. Thank you !! – Jeff T. Oct 21 '15 at 7:48
    
@JeffT. Yes, it is much generic in way, I have use this approach for our WPF project! – Ankush Madankar Oct 21 '15 at 7:57
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using what Rune Grimstad said I end up with this:

string executablePath = Path.GetDirectoryName(Application.ExecutablePath);
string[] directories = Directory.GetDirectories(executablePath);
foreach (string s in directories)
{
    try
    {
        DirectoryInfo langDirectory = new DirectoryInfo(s);
        cmbLanguage.Items.Add(CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo(langDirectory.Name));
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {

    }
}

or another way

int pathLenght = executablePath.Length + 1;
foreach (string s in directories)
{
    try
    {
        cmbLanguage.Items.Add(CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo(s.Remove(0, pathLenght)));
    }
    catch (Exception)
    {

    }
}

I still don't think that this is a good idea ...

share|improve this answer
    
I think this is the only solution we got. I'm in the same boat. – Jippers Mar 25 '10 at 21:42

based on answer by @hans-holzbart but fixed to not return the InvariantCulture too and wrapped into a reusable method:

public static IEnumerable<CultureInfo> GetAvailableCultures()
{
  List<CultureInfo> result = new List<CultureInfo>();

  ResourceManager rm = new ResourceManager(typeof(Resources));

  CultureInfo[] cultures = CultureInfo.GetCultures(CultureTypes.AllCultures);
  foreach (CultureInfo culture in cultures)
  {
    try
    {
      if (culture.Equals(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture)) continue; //do not use "==", won't work

      ResourceSet rs = rm.GetResourceSet(culture, true, false);
      if (rs != null)
        result.Add(culture);
    }
    catch (CultureNotFoundException)
    {
      //NOP
    }
  }
  return result;
}

using that method, you can get a list of strings to add to some ComboBox with the following:

public static ObservableCollection<string> GetAvailableLanguages()
{
  var languages = new ObservableCollection<string>();
  var cultures = GetAvailableCultures();
  foreach (CultureInfo culture in cultures)
    languages.Add(culture.NativeName + " (" + culture.EnglishName + " [" + culture.TwoLetterISOLanguageName + "])");
  return languages;
}
share|improve this answer

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