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I have what I assume is a very simple problem, but the solution has escaped me. I have a UITabBarController app. There are two views, I'll call them A and B. And of course I have an AppDelegate class that initializes the tab bar.

View B has a button called clearScore:. When it is pressed, view B needs to invoke directly or indirectly clearScore: on view A. Can someone show me the steps to make this happen? Thanks for any help!

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1  
You mean you have viewController A and B, right? –  Nick Weaver Apr 3 '11 at 21:07

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use Notifications or Key-Value-Observing (KVO).

Let's assume you've got a model object in which your property score resides. Now you add a Key-Value-Observer in you viewController B to the score property of the model instance. When you press clearScore in A you set the score property to 0(or nil). The Observer will inform B that the property changed so you can easily update your view of B.

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Thanks! I am looking into these. It is frustrating to me to come from an OO background where the model is so important to me and then get to iPhone dev and the model is mentioned but not emphasized. I have done a lot of online reading and have two highly-rated books, but I still struggle for solid examples of how to design these apps properly. –  Mark Apr 5 '11 at 14:29
    
Then you should have a deep look at Core Data. It's very helpful to create, manage and use a model. –  Nick Weaver Apr 5 '11 at 15:44
    
I'll read more... I was aware that there is more model focus there, but seems to be data-centric rather than model-centric (at least how I define a model). I'll definitely read more in that area though - must fit a model into these apps! –  Mark Apr 5 '11 at 18:11
    
Good reading is Pro Core Data for iOS from APRESS. –  Nick Weaver Apr 5 '11 at 19:48

I think there is a more simple way to achieved that:

You can use something like the below code in bViewController:

for (UIViewController* testViewController in self.tabBarController.viewControllers) {
    if ([testViewController respondsToSelector:@selector(clearScore)]) {
        [(aViewController *)testViewController clearScore];
    }
}

Or:

for (UIViewController* testViewController in self.tabBarController.viewControllers) {
    if ([testViewController isKindOfClass:[aViewController class]]) {
        [(aViewController *)testViewController clearScore];
    }
}

Don't forget to #import "aViewController.h" in bViewController's header;

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Views should talk directly only to their own controllers, and a controller shouldn't talk to views other than its own. If one of view controller B's buttons should result in a message being sent to view controller A, then the button should trigger an action in controller B that in turn sends a message to A.

However, -clearScore: sounds like a method that would be part of a model rather than part of a controller, and the fact that B has an interest is further evidence of the same. You might want to think about refactoring your code a bit.

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I'm definitely interested in refactoring - my issue is guidance for that (see comment above). Any pointers? –  Mark Apr 5 '11 at 14:30
    
Best advice is to read about the Model-View-Controller pattern. The data that your app processes and the rules that govern it should make up the model. A -clearScore: method sounds like something to do with a game's state, so that would be an operation on the model. The view should know how to display the game and recognize input, but rules of the game are again part of the model. Controllers get data from the model and display it in the view, and get input from the view and send it to the model. –  Caleb Apr 5 '11 at 15:47
    
Thanks Caleb. I'm comfortable with MVC, having used it for years in my development work, lately in Java and Smalltalk before that. But for iPhone dev, seems to be underemphasized IMO. Thanks again! –  Mark Apr 5 '11 at 18:10
    - (BOOL)application:(UIApplication *)application didFinishLaunchingWithOptions:(NSDictionary *)launchOptions
    {
    //other codes

    [self.tabBarController setDelegate:self]

    //other codes
    }

// UITabBarControllerDelegate method.
- (void)tabBarController:(UITabBarController *)tabBarController didSelectViewController:(UIViewController *)viewController
{
    if ([viewController respondsToSelector:@selector(reloadDataTemp)]) {
        [(YourViewController *)viewController reloadData];
    }
}
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