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I have multiple files and classes. To put it simply, one will run calculations one the location of a particle while another class moves the particle. The problem I'm having is that the particle is being moved before the first class is finished with the calculations. I tried making both methods synchronized but that didn't seem to make a different, is it because they are in different classes? What's the best way to do this?

EDIT: I am not using threads at all, it just seems that it's running multiple methods in parallel.

EDIT 2: Here's an outline of my code

MovingParticle.java

public int x, y;

public void shootParticle(){
//move particle and change x, y values
//this method is called by a timer
}

public void drawParticle(){
//draws the particle
}

Second file

AllOtherParticles.java

public void checkIfTheyCollide(){
for(run through arrayList){
    //check if it collides with each point in array
}

public void drawCluster(){
//draws the cluster
}
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4  
synchronized (TheParticle) { ... } –  Erik Apr 3 '11 at 22:59
1  
Erik, that should be an answer so I can upvote it :-) –  meriton Apr 3 '11 at 23:01
    
There is a bug in your code, post the code. –  ThomasRS Apr 3 '11 at 23:17
1  
All java calls on a single thread are synchronized, i.e. executed in order. And synchronization locks are for multiple threads. So the only logical conclution is that your code has a bug. –  ThomasRS Apr 3 '11 at 23:37
1  
Ahhh.. timers run on different threads. Read the docs. In general, avoid multiple threads if possible, it is much more difficult. You can have a single thread doing Thread.sleep(time) as an alternative. –  ThomasRS Apr 3 '11 at 23:54
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I tried making both methods synchronized but that didn't seem to make a different, is it because they are in different classes?

Yes, adding the synchronized modifier to a method synchronizes on the object the method is invoked on. That is,

public synchronized void foo() {
    // code
}

is equivalent to

public void foo() {
    synchronized (this) {
        // code
    }
}

Since the methods reside in different classes, this refers to different objects, and you are therefore not using the same lock in both methods.

A reasonable way to solve your immediate problem would be to do:

class Particle {
    synchronized void setLocation(Location loc) {
        // code
    }

    synchronized Location getLocation() {
        return location;
    }
}

Edit: Of course, that assumes more than one thread is involved. If there's only one thread, synchronized has no effect and thus won't help.

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Would the method calling getLocation() hold the lock long enough to finish all the calculations on the location? –  yousefcisco Apr 3 '11 at 23:10
    
is there a way to simulate synchronization without multi-threading? –  yousefcisco Apr 3 '11 at 23:25
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I do not get yet why you are using threads at all, instead of a simple loop, using many classes in it's body.

But maybe the Cyclic Barrier will help you using your Threading problems, which I did not understand yet completely.

Using a Cyclic Barrier allows you e.g. to count up from 1 to 100 in multiple threads, ensuring one is never more than 1 step faster than the other threads are.

http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/CyclicBarrier.html

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I'm sorry I wasn't clear. I'm not using multithreading. It just seems that my program is running multiple methods at the same time. –  yousefcisco Apr 3 '11 at 23:06
    
If you are not using multithreading, your programm never runs two methods at the same time. just use eclipe's debugger to solve your problem and please vote me up, cos I just need 10+ for 250 =) –  tokam Apr 3 '11 at 23:09
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Synchronize on the object you're modifying in both threads.

synchronized (TheParticle) {
  // Move it
}


synchronized (TheParticle) {
  // Calculate on it
}
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The object is being moved from a method within. While the calculations are being done in a method in a different class. –  yousefcisco Apr 3 '11 at 23:08
    
@yousefrisco: You can use synchronized(this) { ... } –  Erik Apr 3 '11 at 23:09
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Assuming that the methods are not methods on the same Class, if you simply declare them as synchronized they won't synchronize on the same object. Hence you haven't implemented mutual exclusion.

If you want two different classes to synchronize on the same object, you need to do something like this:

public class Particle {
    public synchronized void foo() {
        // ... in critical region 
    }
}

public class Mover {
    public void bar() {
        ...
        synchronize (someParticle) {
            // ... in critical region 
        }
        ...
    }
}

Note that the two methods need to synchronize on the same Particle instance. The synchronized statement allows you to synchronize on a specified instance, rather than on this.

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