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I'm building a web app (just for fun xD), in wich you can tell it where you are and where you want to go, and then you can search for a list of buses you may take.

My db is something like this:

buses
---------------------------------
id | bus_number | bus_description

routes
-----------------------
id | bus_id | lat | lng

routes table, as you may notice, stores the route points that the bus follows, points wich I will be displaying with a polyline, if any search results are found. The question is how can I write some SQL, given this 2 parameters (where the user is, and where he wanna go) and find and show the correct buses?

I've found this select statement from Google Maps docs, wich is nice (and works great!) because it can tell me if a given Lat/Lng is in the radius (in this case 25 miles) of another one:

SELECT id, ( 3959 * acos( cos( radians(37) ) * cos( radians( lat ) ) * cos( radians( lng ) - radians(-122) ) + sin( radians(37) ) * sin( radians( lat ) ) ) ) AS distance FROM markers HAVING distance < 25 ORDER BY distance LIMIT 0 , 20;

But I need this to work with 2 given Lat/Lng so I can tell where the user must take the bus, and where to get down.

Thanks!!

(Oh, I forgot, there is a preview, just plain html and nothing working, but useful if you would like to see how I plan to this app look like. Btw it is in spanish, here you go in english google translated)

Update: Here is some sample data on the routes table:

+----+-------+------------+------------+
| id | bus_id| lat        | lng        |
+----+-------+------------+------------+
|  1 |     1 | -31,527273 | -68,521408 |
|  2 |     1 | -32,890182 | -68,844048 |
|  3 |     1 | -31,527273 | -68,521408 |
|  4 |     1 | -32,890182 | -68,844048 |
|  5 |     1 | -31,527273 | -68,521408 |
|  6 |     2 | -32,890182 | -68,844048 |
|  7 |     2 | -31,527273 | -68,521408 |
|  8 |     2 | -32,890182 | -68,844048 |
|  9 |     2 | -31,527273 | -68,521408 |
|  10|     2 | -32,890182 | -68,844048 |
+----+-------+------------+------------+

Just ignore the repeated lat,lng values, the point is that a bus route will have many, hundreds of points to describe the complete route.

share|improve this question
    
I don't understand the point. Is bus going from A to B or from A..B ? You can dump some data here while you at it. –  webarto Apr 3 '11 at 23:32
    
The bus is going from A..B, so the routes table will have something like this: id|bus_id|lat|lng ---------------------- 1, 1, -43.341,-33.2321 2, 1, -43.342,-33.2322 3, 1, -43.343,-33.2323 4, 1, -43.344,-33.2324 –  ricardocasares Apr 3 '11 at 23:38
    
(ok I don't know how the "code" formatting works for comments) –  ricardocasares Apr 3 '11 at 23:41
    
Ok, you have find nearest bus stations relative to user, and nearest relative to destination, then check if station A is on the same route as station B (try to match them), something like that. –  webarto Apr 3 '11 at 23:56
    
Yeah exactly, thats what I need. I think I could make the select for the first lat/lng values, then a second for the second lat/lng, and then compare or intersect some how the tables. –  ricardocasares Apr 3 '11 at 23:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Ok, let's get started, using query below you get nearest bus stops in certain radius (miles). Query will return every point within defined radius.

$lat = -31,52;
$lon = -68,52;

$multiplier = 112.12; // use 69.0467669 if you want miles
$distance = 10; // kilometers or miles if 69.0467669

$query = "SELECT *, (SQRT(POW((lat - $lat), 2) + POW((lng - $lng), 2)) * $multiplier) AS distance FROM routes WHERE POW((lat - $lat), 2) + POW((lng - $lng), 2) < POW(($distance / $multiplier), 2) ORDER BY distance ASC";

Result... nearest in 10 mile radius...

enter image description here

farthest but within 10 miles...

enter image description here

Now repeat the same for destination, and then search your table for buses on that route. Also check out this link... http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/spatial-extensions.html

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you webarto! This is the final SQL: SELECT id, number FROM buses WHERE id IN (SELECT bus_id FROM coord WHERE POW((lat - $to_lat), 2) + POW((lng - $to_lng), 2) < POW(($distance / 69.0467669), 2)) AND id IN (SELECT bus_id FROM coord WHERE POW((lat - $in_lat), 2) + POW((lng - $in_lng), 2) < POW(($distance / 69.0467669), 2)) One more question, how can I put this on kilometers? –  ricardocasares Apr 4 '11 at 3:55
    
Took me couple of days to figure everything out while I was working on similar app. Good luck. I thought you use miles. I use km also. I'll update answer. –  webarto Apr 4 '11 at 3:57
1  
@ricardocasares Just replace that 69.x with 111.12, that's it. –  webarto Apr 4 '11 at 4:00
    
thank you so much! good luck with your app too! –  ricardocasares Apr 4 '11 at 4:06
    
if those coordinates are indicative of your location, you should use distinct values for km/degree for each axis: zodiacal.com/tools/lat_table.php indicates each degree of longitude near -68 lat is only 23 miles –  Robot Woods Apr 13 '11 at 16:51

I think you'll have to do something like:

1) search the routes table for all points within X distance of the users desired destination, and for each, store into an array:

  • bus_id
  • distance between that route row and user
  • route row id

2) find the smallest distance for each bus_id, leaving a smaller array of a single point per bus_id (not sure exactly the best approach to this, but maybe some second query using distance, sorted ascending, limit 1)

3) walk through this array, searching for all points in the route table that are within X distance of the user start point, AND that have the bus_id being tested. put these in a second array

4) repeat step 2 on the end-point array

5) there should just now be one point for each bus_id in each array, so you could plot your polylines for each bus_id appearing in both set (if you have a very user friendly transit system there might be more than one)

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