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I have a Unicode problem... I´ve done this before but for now, I cannot understand why the Icelandic letters don´t show up - I have those question marks again

Here is the url (very plain and short html5) http://nicejob.is/new/

Everything I Google says: use the <meta charset="utf-8"> as I do.

Any suggestions?

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1  
seams like it is not UTF8 but ISO-8859-1 –  aSeptik Apr 4 '11 at 0:33
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The link nicejob.is/new is broken! –  Marco Demaio Jan 6 '12 at 11:52
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5 Answers 5

Your page is already viewed as UTF-8. But your source code is not saved as UTF-8.

Please change the encoding of your source code file to UTF-8.

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Not all browsers support HTML5-way tags yet

here you can see table of compability

Try this instead:

<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html;charset=utf-8">
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Actually all browsers support <meta charset=...> because a lot of people were screwing it up anyway. That's why it became a standard. –  kzh Jun 1 '11 at 20:39
    
@Innuendo: the link you provided is broken –  Marco Demaio Jan 6 '12 at 11:35
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I can see a couple of issues.

  1. The META should look like this:

    <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html;charset=utf-8" />

  2. The <html> specified lang="en" which might be prone to confusing some browsers.

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I replaced with your code but still don´t work I also removed the html lang en –  Ingþór Ingólfsson Apr 4 '11 at 0:34
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downvoted for not paying attention to the original question. Ingþór clearly stated that HTML5 is being used. http-equiv is the old pre-HTML5 way of specifying the HTML's charset. HTML5 does away with that bloated syntax and introduces the new charset attribute that Ingþór showed. –  Remy Lebeau Apr 4 '11 at 6:54
    
Fair enough. Though the HTML doc itself does not specify HTML 5 for the doc type, and I read the HTML 5 in the question as being a reference to the URL, not the document. And how does this differ from the answer directly above, which has 2 upvotes and no down votes? –  Roger Willcocks Apr 7 '11 at 20:23
    
Yes, the HTML doc does specify HTML5 is being used. The very first line of the file is <!DOCTYPE html>, which is the newer HTML5 doctype. –  Remy Lebeau Apr 11 '11 at 22:06
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When I view the HTML from the browser, the question marks are encoded as 0xEF 0xBF 0xBD, which is the UTF-8 encoding for the byte order mark or BOM, aka U+FEFF. So, for whatever reason, the HTML is not transmitted as sensible UTF-8 (though it does seem to be valid UTF-8).

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what you have to do is to save the file with utf-8 encoding by using the notpad (the attached one with windows) ...

steps :

save as ..

in the below options ... you will find encoding option choose UTF-8 ...

and save the file ...

then add the line <meta charset="UTF-8" /> inside your file ...

and it is ganna work insha allah

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Are you sure the OP is using Windows? –  Azder May 24 at 12:05
    
What do you mean by OP :-| –  mohammed balhadadd Jun 8 at 14:29
    
Original Poster en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OP –  Azder Jun 9 at 1:00
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