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Not sure why I'm getting a segmentation fault here:

//I define the variables used for input

int *numberOfDonuts;
    numberOfDonuts = (int *)malloc(sizeof(int));

char *charInput;
    charInput = (char *)malloc(sizeof(char));   

int *numberOfMilkshakes;
    numberOfMilkshakes = (int *)malloc(sizeof(int));

//Then attempt to read input
scanf("%c %d %d", &*charInput, &*numberOfDonuts, &*numberOfMilkshakes);

Then I get a segmentation fault on this line. Can't work out what I'm doing wrong?

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I don't see anything segfaulty with this code. Could you try compiling your program without optimization (e.g. gcc -Wall -W -g program.c ) ? When optimization is enabled, the debugger might not be taking you to the exact line the segfault is happening on. –  Joey Adams Apr 4 '11 at 0:51
1  
Since you don't check the return values from malloc(), is there any chance that you've already fouled up the memory allocation system and are accessing null pointers here? –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 4 '11 at 0:53
    
What happens if you remove all occurrences of &*, i.e. change it to scanf("%c %d %d", charInput, numberOfDonuts, numberOfMilkshakes); –  Mikel Apr 4 '11 at 1:14
1  
Please don't cast the return value from malloc (or calloc or realloc), there's no need in C and it can hide problems. –  mu is too short Apr 4 '11 at 1:27

3 Answers 3

You're overcomplicating things with the way you're allocating your variables. This should do what you want:

int numberOfDonuts;
char charInput;
int numberOfMilkshakes;

scanf("%c %d %d", &charInput, &numberOfDonuts, &numberOfMilkshakes);

With basic types like int and char you don't have to explicitly allocate memory for them. The compiler handles that for you.

Even allocating them the way you did, though, what you end up with is a pointer to the value rather than the value itself. Given that scanf wants a bunch of pointers there's no need to dereference the pointer and then get it's address again, which is what you're trying to do. The following will work as well:

int *numberOfDonuts;
    numberOfDonuts = malloc(sizeof(int));

char *charInput;
    charInput = malloc(sizeof(char));   

int *numberOfMilkshakes;
    numberOfMilkshakes = malloc(sizeof(int));

scanf("%c %d %d", charInput, numberOfDonuts, numberOfMilkshakes);
share|improve this answer
    
@pmg: Point taken. It's been a while since I've done any serious work in C. I was basically trying to show the redundancy of the combined dereference and address-of operators. I've removed the casts from my answer. –  Andrew Cooper Apr 4 '11 at 12:17

As far as I can tell, this code is valid.

It compiles on my system and works as expected.

Is this your whole program?

You should also note that all those pointers are not required.

You could just write it like this:

int numberOfDonuts;
char charInput;
int numberOfMilkshakes;

//Then attempt to read input
scanf("%c %d %d", &charInput, &numberOfDonuts, &numberOfMilkshakes);

printf("char=%c donuts=%d milkshakes=%d\n",
        charInput, numberOfDonuts, numberOfMilkshakes);
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Actually, I'm not sure if it's strictly valid, what I meant to say is that the intent was clear. –  Mikel Apr 4 '11 at 1:03

Segmentation faults occur when the program tries to access invalid memory locations.

Since you use malloc in your program to allocate memory, it is always best to check whether a valid memory location is returned before attempting to store a value in that location. Include this check every time malloc is used in your program to resolve the error.

For eg:

int *numberOfDonuts = (int *)malloc(sizeof(int));
if(numberOfDonuts == NULL)
{
  printf("Memory allocation Failure\n");
  return;
}
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