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JsLex is a Javascript lexer I've written in Python. It does a good job for a day's work (or so), but I'm sure there are cases it gets wrong. In particular, it doesn't understand anything about semicolon insertion, and there are probably ways that's important for lexing. I just don't know what they are.

What Javascript code does JsLex lex incorrectly? I'm especially interested in valid Javascript source where JsLex incorrectly identifies regex literals.

Just to be clear, by "lexing" I mean identifying tokens in a source file. JsLex makes no attempt to parse Javascript, much less execute it. I've written JsLex to do full lexing, though to be honest I would be happy if it merely was able to successfully find all the regex literals.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted
+200

Interestingly enough I tried your lexer on the code of my lexer/evaluator written in JS ;) You're right, it is not always doing well with regular expressions. Here some examples:

rexl.re = {
  NAME: /^(?!\d)(?:\w)+|^"(?:[^"]|"")+"/,
  UNQUOTED_LITERAL: /^@(?:(?!\d)(?:\w|\:)+|^"(?:[^"]|"")+")\[[^\]]+\]/,
  QUOTED_LITERAL: /^'(?:[^']|'')*'/,
  NUMERIC_LITERAL: /^[0-9]+(?:\.[0-9]*(?:[eE][-+][0-9]+)?)?/,
  SYMBOL: /^(?:==|=|<>|<=|<|>=|>|!~~|!~|~~|~|!==|!=|!~=|!~|!|&|\||\.|\:|,|\(|\)|\[|\]|\{|\}|\?|\:|;|@|\^|\/\+|\/|\*|\+|-)/
};

This one is mostly fine - only UNQUITED_LITERAL is not recognized, otherwise all is fine. But now let's make a minor addition to it:

rexl.re = {
  NAME: /^(?!\d)(?:\w)+|^"(?:[^"]|"")+"/,
  UNQUOTED_LITERAL: /^@(?:(?!\d)(?:\w|\:)+|^"(?:[^"]|"")+")\[[^\]]+\]/,
  QUOTED_LITERAL: /^'(?:[^']|'')*'/,
  NUMERIC_LITERAL: /^[0-9]+(?:\.[0-9]*(?:[eE][-+][0-9]+)?)?/,
  SYMBOL: /^(?:==|=|<>|<=|<|>=|>|!~~|!~|~~|~|!==|!=|!~=|!~|!|&|\||\.|\:|,|\(|\)|\[|\]|\{|\}|\?|\:|;|@|\^|\/\+|\/|\*|\+|-)/
};
str = '"';

Now all after the NAME's regexp messes up. It makes 1 big string. I think the latter problem is that String token is too greedy. The former one might be too smart regexp for the regex token.

Edit: I think I've fixed the regexp for the regex token. In your code replace lines 146-153 (the whole 'following characters' part) with the following expression:

([^/]|(?<!\\)(?<=\\)/)*

The idea is to allow everything except /, also allow \/, but not allow \\/.

Edit: Another interesting case, passes after the fix, but might be interesting to add as the built-in test case:

    case 'UNQUOTED_LITERAL': 
    case 'QUOTED_LITERAL': {
        this._js =  "e.str(\"" + this.value.replace(/\\/g, "\\\\").replace(/"/g, "\\\"") + "\")";
        break;
    }

Edit: Yet another case. It appears to be too greedy about keywords as well. See the case:

var clazz = function() {
    if (clazz.__) return delete(clazz.__);
    this.constructor = clazz;
    if(constructor)
        constructor.apply(this, arguments);
};

It lexes it as: (keyword, const), (id, ructor). The same happens for an identifier inherits: in and herits.

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Would your regex parse \\\/ and \\\\/ correctly? –  configurator Apr 6 '11 at 22:27
    
@configurator, yes, it parses both of them fine. –  zindel Apr 6 '11 at 22:39
    
thanks for these cases, they helped find the problem with my regex-matching regex. I haven't taken your solution, but instead removed the stupid error in mind: backslashes at the end of comments joined lines together, commenting out the recognition of escapes in character classes in regexes. Thanks, I've added these cases to the test suite. –  Ned Batchelder Apr 7 '11 at 4:51
    
good point about the keywords. I've fixed that now as well. Keep 'em coming! –  Ned Batchelder Apr 7 '11 at 12:10
    
@Ned the latest code works just great. I've tested is on several rather big and sophisticated JS files with nasty regular expressions - it worked just brilliantly. Tried to beat it with some artificial (but valid) regexps - worked well again. Sometimes it breaks on illegal regexps like this one /\/i, but I'm not sure if you want to handle such cases at all. Thanks for an interesting problem, btw! –  zindel Apr 7 '11 at 13:27

Example: The first occurrence of / 2 /i below (the assignment to a) should tokenize as Div, NumericLiteral, Div, Identifier, because it is in a InputElementDiv context. The second occurrence (the assignment to b) should tokenize as RegularExpressionLiteral, because it is in a InputElementRegExp context.

i = 1;
var a = 1 / 2 /i;
console.info(a); // ⇒ 0.5
console.info(typeof a); // number

var b = 1 + / 2 /i;
console.info(b); // ⇒ 1/2/i
console.info(typeof b); // ⇒ string

Source:

There are two goal symbols for the lexical grammar. The InputElementDiv symbol is used in those syntactic grammar contexts where a division (/) or division-assignment (/=) operator is permitted. The InputElementRegExp symbol is used in other syntactic grammar contexts.

Note that contexts exist in the syntactic grammar where both a division and a RegularExpressionLiteral are permitted by the syntactic grammar; however, since the lexical grammar uses the InputElementDiv goal symbol in such cases, the opening slash is not recognised as starting a regular expression literal in such a context. As a workaround, one may enclose the regular expression literal in parentheses. — Standard ECMA-262 3rd Edition - December 1999, p. 11

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Thanks for the extra example. I'm pleased to report that JsLex properly handles both cases. –  Ned Batchelder Apr 11 '11 at 1:50

The simplicity of your solution for handling this hairy problem is very cool, but I noticed that it doesn't quite handle a change in something.property syntax for ES5, which allows reserved words following a .. I.e., a.if = 'foo'; (function () {a.if /= 3;});, is a valid statement in some recent implementations.

Unless I'm mistaken there is only one use of . anyway for properties, so the fix could be adding an additional state following the . which only accepts the identifierName token (which is what identifier uses, but it doesn't reject reserved words) would probably do the trick. (Obviously the div state follows that as per usual.)

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Interesting point. I could argue that the lexer doesn't care about this point, it will be up to the grammar to allow a keyword as a property, I'm not sure. For my purposes (finding strings and regexes), the different doesn't matter, but thanks for pointing it out! –  Ned Batchelder May 4 '11 at 12:12

I've been thinking about the problems of writing a lexer for JavaScript myself, and I just came across your implementation in my search for good techniques. I found a case where yours doesn't work that I thought I'd share if you're still interested:

var g = 3, x = { valueOf: function() { return 6;} } /2/g;

The slashes should both be parsed as division operators, resulting in x being assigned the numeric value 1. Your lexer thinks that it is a regexp. There is no way to handle all variants of this case correctly without maintaining a stack of grouping contexts to distinguish among the end of a block (expect regexp), the end of a function statement (expect regexp), the end of a function expression (expect division), and the end of an object literal (expect division).

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Does it work properly for this code (this shouldn't have a semicolon; it produces an error when lexed properly)?

function square(num) {
    var result;
    var f = function (x) {
        return x * x;
    }
    (result = f(num));
    return result;
}

If it does, does it work properly for this code, that relies on semicolon insertion?

function square(num) {
    var f = function (x) {
        return x * x;
    }
    return f(num);
}
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It does work fine for this code, because all it's doing is identifying tokens. I'm mostly concerned with finding regex literals (I updated the question to make this clear). –  Ned Batchelder Apr 4 '11 at 2:51
    
It's not clear to me whether the first example is supposed to be an example of correct syntax or not. –  Zach Apr 4 '11 at 3:13
    
@Zach: Correct syntax; incorrect code though. The function fails with a type error because it says var f = function (x) { return x * x } (result = f(num)); thus applying f before it is set. –  configurator Apr 4 '11 at 4:48
3  
@ThiefMaster: you might want to investigate more before declaring something "pretty easy". For example, how do you determine that the / isn't part of a division? And slashes can also appear inside a regex like /[/]/. –  Ned Batchelder Apr 6 '11 at 15:00
1  
@ThiefMaster: It's actually extremely complicated. They can look like division unless you pay close attention to details. Division: a/(b+c/d+e)/g, Regex: /(b+c/d+e)/g. –  configurator Apr 6 '11 at 22:25

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