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i have seen in ruby as well powershell programming we can assign variables like a,b=b,a . it actually swaps the variable .

Is this possible in f# if so please guide me with some reference

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possible duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/946977/… –  BrokenGlass Apr 4 '11 at 3:51
    
I am learning python and imagine how cool F# could be if we allow: a, b <- b, a, x.[a], x.[b] <- x[b], x[a] So that swap is no longer needed. –  colinfang Sep 30 '13 at 12:03

1 Answer 1

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Generally, F# doesn't allow variable re-assignment. Rather it favors immutable named values via let bindings. So, the following is not possible:

let a = 3
a = 4

Unless you explicitly mark a as mutable:

let mutable a = 3
a <- 4

However, F# does allow in most situations variable "shadowing". The only restriction to this is that it can not be done on top level modules. But, within a function, for example, the following works fine:

let f () =
    let a,b = 1,2
    let a,b = b,a //"swap"
    a,b
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omg, I didn't realize F# in fact support "shadowing" besides in FSI. Though I am not sure if it is an abuse to harness shadowing to achieve simple mutable, it is convenient. –  colinfang Sep 30 '13 at 12:02
1  
On the contrary, I would always prefer shadowing over mutation. Shadowing has the same advantages as immutable data structures: different "versions" of your data are frozen in a certain scope. For example, shadowed variables are much easier to reason about when considering capture in a closure (in fact, F# doesn't allow capturing mutable variables in closures, but it does allow capturing immutable variables of type ref, which has the same effect). –  Stephen Swensen Sep 30 '13 at 14:54

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