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I'm working on an Event library and I'm facing a problem with Variadic templates.

All is working very nice except the fact that I can't pass references as parameters...

Here is a very simplified example wrote to expose my problem.

struct DelayedSignal 
{   
    ~DelayedSignal ()
    { std::cout << "~DelayedSignal CLOSE" << std::endl; }

    template<class C, class... Args>
    DelayedSignal ( void(C::*func)(Args...), C& obj )
    { std::cout << "DelayedSignal INIT - 03 - pointer to method & pointer to class instance (Arg num: " << sizeof...(Args) << ")" << std::endl; }

    template<class C, class... Args>
    DelayedSignal ( void(C::*func)(Args...), C& obj, Args... args )
    {
        std::cout << "DelayedSignal INIT - 04 - pointer to method & pointer to class instance & arguments (Arg num: " << sizeof...(Args) << ")" << std::endl;
    }
};

template<class... ArgsBis>
struct DelayedSignal_DebugHelper 
{
    ~DelayedSignal_DebugHelper ()
    { std::cout << "~DelayedSignal_DebugHelper CLOSE" << std::endl; }

    template<class C, class... Args>
    DelayedSignal_DebugHelper ( void(C::*func)(Args...), C& obj )
    { std::cout << "DelayedSignal_DebugHelper INIT - 03 - pointer to method & pointer to class instance (Arg num: " << sizeof...(Args) << ")" << std::endl; }

    template<class C, class... Args>
    DelayedSignal_DebugHelper ( void(C::*func)(Args...), C& obj, ArgsBis... args ) // Need to use ArgsBis instead of Args to make it work
    {
        std::cout << "DelayedSignal_DebugHelper INIT - 04 - pointer to method & pointer to class instance & arguments (Arg num: " << sizeof...(Args) << ")" << std::endl;
    }
};


template < class Tr, class... Args >
struct Signal
{
    void fire ( Args... args ) { std::cout << "Signal::fire::" << sizeof...(Args) << std::endl; }
};

struct Klass {};


int main()
{
    std::string str1("Blop");   // Will be used as reference
    Klass k;                    // Will be used as reference

    Signal<void, Klass&> signal_01;
    Signal<void, std::string&> signal_02;

    std::cout << "====== DelayedSignal :: needed for production purpose ===============" << std::endl;

    // OK
    DelayedSignal test01(&Signal<void, std::string&>::fire, signal_02);
    // HERE IS THE PROBLEM
    //DelayedSignal test02(&Signal<void, std::string&>::fire, signal_02, str1);

    // OK
    DelayedSignal test03(&Signal<void, Klass&>::fire, signal_01);
    // HERE IS THE PROBLEM
    //DelayedSignal test04(&Signal<void, Klass&>::fire, signal_01, k);

    std::cout << "====== DelayedSignal_DebugHelper :: used only for debug purpose ======" << std::endl;

    // OK
    DelayedSignal_DebugHelper<std::string&> test05(&Signal<void, std::string&>::fire, signal_02);
    // OK
    DelayedSignal_DebugHelper<std::string&> test06(&Signal<void, std::string&>::fire, signal_02, str1);

    // OK
    DelayedSignal_DebugHelper<Klass&> test07(&Signal<void, Klass&>::fire, signal_01);
    // OK
    DelayedSignal_DebugHelper<Klass&> test08(&Signal<void, Klass&>::fire, signal_01, k);

    return 1;
}

As I register all DelayedSignal instances into a single std::list instance I would like to avoid using template on the class itself, and that's why I use templates on the constructors instead. I could also use a pure virtual class as base for all DelayedSignal and register pointers to the virtual class into the std::list but I think it's best to minimize the use of virtual methods and I'm really intrigued by this problem...

As you can see in this example, test02 and test04 return errors if they are activated. DelayedSignal_DebugHelper is almost identical to DelayedSignal except the fact that it use ArgsBis (a class template argument) on the last constructor instead of the Args template (the method template argument), else it doesn't work (as with DelayedSignal). Args is accepted on the void(C::*func)(Args...) but is not with ArgsBis... args dispite the fact they are in the same constructor declaration.

As far as I know, there is no problem without references (DelayedSignal test04(&Signal<void, Klass>::fire, signal_01, k); for instance) or with multiple parameters (or none) as long as there is no references.

Is there anyway to fix this problem ?

Thank you.

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compiler version? –  Ben Voigt Apr 4 '11 at 5:58
    
@Valke Shouldn't you tag this with c++0x? I tried compiling your solution and was wondering why it wasn't working in Visual Studio 2011; after looking up variadic templates, I just realized that if the search is correct, it's a new feature. What compilers actually support this anyway? –  leetNightshade Apr 4 '11 at 9:41
    
@leet: added tag. This feature has been supported by g++ since version 4.3 -- see this link for more info: gcc.gnu.org/projects/cxx0x.html –  TonyK Apr 4 '11 at 10:59
    
@Ben Voigt: I'm using GCC 4.5.0 –  Valkea Apr 4 '11 at 12:22
    
@leetNightshade: Oh sorry, Yes I do compile it using C++0x. –  Valkea Apr 4 '11 at 12:27
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Howard Hinnant is right... The other possibility you have is to use references everywhere, e.g.:

#include <iostream>

struct DelayedSignal 
{   
    ~DelayedSignal ()
     { std::cout << "~DelayedSignal CLOSE" << std::endl; }

    template<class C, class... Args>
    DelayedSignal ( void(C::*func)(Args &...), C& obj )
    { std::cout << "DelayedSignal INIT - 03 - pointer to method & pointer to class instance (Arg num: " << sizeof...(Args) << ")" << std::endl; }

    template<class C, class... Args>
    DelayedSignal ( void(C::*func)(Args &...), C& obj, Args & ... args )
    {
        std::cout << "DelayedSignal INIT - 04 - pointer to method & pointer to class instance & arguments (Arg num: " << sizeof...(Args) << ")" << std::endl;
    }
};

template < class Tr, class... Args >
struct Signal
{
     void fire ( Args &... args ) { std::cout << "Signal::fire::" << sizeof...(Args) << std::endl; }
};

struct Klass {};

int main()
{
    std::string str1("Blop");   // Will be used as reference
    Klass k;                    // Will be used as reference

    Signal<void, Klass&> signal_01;
    Signal<void, std::string&> signal_02;

    std::cout << "====== DelayedSignal :: needed for production purpose ===============" << std::endl;

    // OK
    DelayedSignal test01(&Signal<void, std::string&>::fire, signal_02);
    // HERE IS THE PROBLEM
    DelayedSignal test02(&Signal<void, std::string&>::fire, signal_02, str1);

}
share|improve this answer
    
This solution solves at least partially my problem. The both answers are valid, but as I can choose only one of them, I selected the one with a partial solution. –  Valkea Apr 5 '11 at 14:03
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I'm using clang which gives an absolutely fabulous error message:

test.cpp:59:19: error: no matching constructor for initialization of 'DelayedSignal'
    DelayedSignal test02(&Signal<void, std::string&>::fire, signal_02, str1);
                  ^      ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
test.cpp:9:5: note: candidate constructor template not viable: requires 2 arguments, but 3 were provided
    DelayedSignal ( void(C::*func)(Args...), C& obj )
    ^
test.cpp:13:5: note: candidate template ignored: deduced conflicting types for parameter 'Args'
      (<std::__1::basic_string<char> &> vs. <std::__1::basic_string<char>>)
    DelayedSignal ( void(C::*func)(Args...), C& obj, Args... args )
    ^

The compiler deduces conflicting types for Args:

  1. std::string&
  2. std::string

I believe the best way to fix this is exactly how you have done so with your DelayedSignal_DebugHelper.

share|improve this answer
    
Hello, very interesting and... strange. My error message is less descriptive : main.cpp:2:74: error: no matching function for call to 'DelayedSignal::DelayedSignal(void (Signal<void(std::basic_string<char>&)>::*)(std::basic_string<char>&), Signal<void(std::basic_string<char>&)>&, std::string&)' main.cpp:57:1: note: candidate is: DelayedSignal::DelayedSignal(const DelayedSignal&) but it look like you are right about the conflicting types. I did not tough of that... I guess I will have to change my way to implement the DelayedSignals. Thank you for your help. –  Valkea Apr 4 '11 at 15:38
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As you have accepted an answer, this is just a supplementation. Though I may overlook something, identity class template like the following seems to make your code compilable.
For example:

template<class T> struct identity { typedef T type; };

struct DelayedSignal
{
    ...
    template<class C, class... Args>
    DelayedSignal ( void(C::*func)(Args...), C& obj, typename identity<Args>::type... args )
    {
       ...
    }
};

Here is a test on ideone

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