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I sell products throgh my website. Recently we've been given a list of rules that need to be checked against each order, to make sure it's not fraudulent. So this list of rules/fraud indicators will change and grow so I want to make sure it's easily maintainable and really solid.

I'm thinking I have an abstract class rule that each of the rules implements.

abstract class Rule
{
    public string Message;
    public bool Success;
    public void CheckOrder(OrderItem currentOrder);
}

class FakeCreditCardNumberRule : Rule
{
   public string Message = "Fake CC Number Rule";
   public void CheckOrder(OrderItem currentOrder)
   {
       currentOrder.CreditCardNumber = "1234-5678-9012-3456";
       Success = false;
   }

}

class ReallyLargeOrderRule : Rule
{
   public string Message = "Really Large Order Rule";
   public void CheckOrder(OrderItem currentOrder)
   {
       currentOrder.ItemsOrder.Count > 100;
       Success = false;
   }

}

Then I'm thinking of having a class that accepts an Order object in it's costructor and checks though the list of rules. Something like:

class FraudChecker
{
    List<Rule> rules;

    public FraudChecker(OrderItem currentOrder)
    {
        foreach(var rule in rules)
        {
            rule.CheckOrder(currentOrder);
        }
    }
}

So I was trying to think of the best place/best way to populate the FraudChecker .Rules list and started thinking there might be some nice design pattern that does something like what I'm doing.

Has anyone seen a design pattern I should use here? Or can anyone think of a good place to populate this list?

-Evan

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3 Answers 3

Specification Pattern

I've been dealing with a very similar issue.

I've found the Specification Pattern to be particularly useful.

For me the main benefits of the pattern is the way it incorporates chaining.

The link above provides a basic overview, and the related links in the article are useful too. After, if you do some more searching you'll find more detailed examples.

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I would probably go with my own implementation of enum. I would create a class like this:

public sealed class Rules
{
    public static readonly Rule FakeCreditCardNumberRule = new FakeCreditCardNumberRule ();
    public static readonly Rule ReallyLargeOrderRule  = new ReallyLargeOrderRule  ();   
    //here I would write more

    private static readonly List<Rule> _all = List<Rule> { FakeCreditCardNumberRule, ReallyLargeOrderRule };
    //every time you add new rule to the class you have to add it to the _all list also

    public static IEnumerable<Rule> All
    {
        get
        {
            return _all;
        }
    }

    public static FraudChecker(OrderItem currentOrder)
    {
        foreach(var rule in All)
        {
            rule.CheckOrder(currentOrder);
        }
    }
}

and then you can use it like this:

Rules.FraudChecker(currentOrder);

or

Rules.FakeCreditCardNumberRule.CheckOrder(currentOrder);

You can add every new rule to the Rules class. You can also create new methods in it that will process only part of the Rules and so on.

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You have already used the Startegy pattern... I believe a factory pattern can solve your problem.

Link

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