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Add is supposed to be an overrided method in which the string is put in the arraylist in alphabetical order, but whenever I execute the program, the Arraylist is always in the order that I added it in.

Here's Test:

import java.util.*;
public class Test
{
    private static ArrayList x=new ArrayList();
    private static ArrayList<String> li=new ArrayList<String>();
    private static SortedList s=new SortedList();
   // private static Person p[]=new Person[4];
   // private static Fraction f[]=new Fraction[5];

    public static void main(String args[])
    {
       //number 1
        x.add(5);
        x.add(6);
        x.add(1.5);
        x.add(7);
        x.add(2.5);
        System.out.println(average(x,2));  //5.5
        System.out.println(average(x,7));   //4.4

        //number 2
        li.add("Hi");
        li.add("del");
        li.add("there");
        li.add("del");
        li.add("you");
        li.add("del");
        System.out.println(li);
        takeOut(li,"del");
        System.out.println(li);

        //number 3
        s.add("dog");
        s.add("anteater");
        s.add("kewl");
        s.add("kitty");
        s.add("a");
        System.out.println(s);

        //number 4
      //  p[0]=new Person("Kremer","Jim");
        //p[1]=new Person("Shi","Kevin");
       // p[2]=new Person("Shi","Rebecca"); //I know I spelled your name wrong, Rebecca. (I needed two last names to be the same)
       // p[3]=new Person("Herman", "Jimmy");
      //  Arrays.sort(p);  //static method in java.util.Arrays
      //  for(int i=0; i<p.length; i++)
        System.out.println(p[i].getFirstName()+" "+p[i].getLastName());

        //number 5
        f[0]=new Fraction(4,5);
       f[1]=new Fraction(5,4);
        f[2]=new Fraction(-8,3);
        f[3]=new Fraction(6,5);
       f[4]=new Fraction(-1,2);
        Arrays.sort(f);
       for(int i=0; i<f.length; i++)
            System.out.println(f[i].getNum()+"/"+f[i].getDenom());
    }

    //number 1
    public static Double average(ArrayList samples, int num)
    {
        double sum=0.0;
        if(num>samples.size())
        {
            for(int i=0; i<samples.size(); i++)
            {
                if(samples.get(i) instanceof Integer)
                    sum+=(Integer)samples.get(i);
                else
                    sum+=(Double)samples.get(i);
            }
            return sum/samples.size();
        }
        else
        {
            for(int i=0; i<num; i++)
            {
                if(samples.get(i) instanceof Integer)
                    sum+=(Integer)samples.get(i);
                else
                    sum+=(Double)samples.get(i);
            }
            return sum/num;
        }

    }

    //number 2
    public static void takeOut(List<String> words, String del)
    {
        for(int i=0; i<words.size(); i++)
        {
            if(words.get(i).equals(del))
            {
                words.remove(i);
                i--;
            }
        }
    }

}

And here's SortedList:

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;
import java.lang.String;

public class SortedList extends ArrayList<String>
{
    private ArrayList<String> a;

    public SortedList()
    {
        a = new ArrayList<String>(10);
    }
    public SortedList(int cap)
    {
        super(cap);
    }
    public boolean add(String x)
    {
        if(a.size()!=0)
        {
            for(int i=0; i<a.size(); i++)
            {
                if(i==a.size()-1)
                    if(x.compareTo(a.get(i))>=0)
                        super.add(x);
                else
                {
                    if(i==0)
                        if(x.compareTo(a.get(i))<=0)
                            super.add(0,x);
                    if(x.compareTo(a.get(i))>=0 && x.compareTo(a.get(i+1))<=0)
                        super.add(i+1,x);
                }
            }
        }
        else
            super.add(x);
        return true;
    }
}

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

a.size() != 0 is always false as your SortedList implementation doesn't add any elements in the list a. This results that super.add(x) is always used and the overridden add-method doesn't actually modify the behavior of an ArrayList

share|improve this answer
    
Oh, ok. So if I change it to a.add(x), would it work? I'm still a little confused on what I should do. –  user690536 Apr 4 '11 at 6:41
    
You should use super.size() instead because you are extending ArrayList. It doesn't really make sense that you have a separate List in your current implementation. Another option would be to implement the List interface and keep an ArrayList as a backing implementation i.e. decorate ArrayList with a sorting add-method. –  Aleksi Yrttiaho Apr 4 '11 at 7:39
    
Note: for larger lists, you might want to implement a binary search to find the correct index. This will give you insert performance of O(log n) instead of O(n). –  Aleksi Yrttiaho Apr 4 '11 at 11:43

User,

Look up Java Collections interface. Java can sort these elements alphabetically for you:

ArrayList<String> a = new ArrayList<String>

a.add("world");
a.add("hello");

Collections.sort(a);

//sorted alphabetically now

If the default sort is the wrong direction, just implement your own Comparator and call:

Collections.sort(a, myComparator);

This should do what you are seeking, unless of course this is a homework assignment...

share|improve this answer
1  
If the elements are added and deleted often it makes sense to insert the element to its proper place instead of sorting the whole collection after each insert. On the other hand, if a sorted collection is needed then a tree-based data structure would make more sense than a list as O(log n) insertion can be achieved instead of O(n). –  Aleksi Yrttiaho Apr 4 '11 at 7:46
    
Good points Aleksi. –  J T Apr 4 '11 at 15:22

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