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Okay, I've been running into some inconsistency and it's driving me towards a fist-sized hole in my moniter I'd rather avoid.

I'm going through an SDL tutorial on www.sdltutorials.com (the sdl-tutorial-basics tutorial I'm sure more than a few people have gone through by Tim Jones) and I ran into an error: ‘Surf_Display’ was not declared in this scope.

So, trying to figure out what's going wrong I wrote similar pointer code into an old rectangle program I used to refresh myself with the basics of C++ classes, saw the same error with an int pointer, and then tried to isolate the issue in something more specific.

Well, the more specific program compiles fine while the others explode so I'm guessing it's something pretty basic I'm missing, but GISing "C++ pointer class", etc, does nothing and I don't know how to get more specific.

Anyway...some code.

The program that works...

ct.h

#ifndef _CT_H_
#define _CT_H_

class Classtest2
{
    private:
        int *p_x;
    public:
        Classtest2();
        void set_x(int);
        int get_x();
};

#endif

ct.cpp

#include "ct.h"
#include <cstddef>

Classtest2::Classtest2()
{
    p_x = 0;
}

void Classtest2::set_x(int x)
{
    //do something neat here
}

int Classtest2::get_x()
{
    return *p_x;
}

classtest2.cpp

#include "ct.h"

int main (int argc, char *argv[])
{
    Classtest2 ct2;

    return 0;
}

compiled with g++ classtest2.cpp ct.h ct.cpp -o bin/classtest2

Now...the program that doesn't... The classic...

#ifndef _RECTANGLE_H
#define _RECTANGLE_H

namespace shapes
{
    class rectangle
    {
    public:
        int height;
        int width;
        int *weight;

        rectangle (int, int);
        rectangle ();
        int area ();
        void setHeight(int);
        void setWidth(int);
        void setDimensions(int, int);
    };
}
#endif

The classic cpp with weight...

#include "Rectangle.h"
#include <cstddef>

using namespace shapes;

rectangle::rectangle(int h, int w)
{
    height = h;
    width = w;
    weight = NULL;
}

rectangle::rectangle()
{
    height = 0;
    width = 0;
    weight = NULL;
}

int rectangle::area ()
{
    return height * width;
}

void rectangle::setHeight(int h)
{
    height = h;
}

void rectangle::setWidth(int w)
{
    width = w;
}

void rectangle::setDimensions(int h, int w)
{
    height = h;
    width = w;
}

And the classic "do something simple" main...

#include "Rectangle.h"
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;
using namespace shapes;

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    rectangle tr(5,8);

    cout << tr.height << endl;
    cout << tr.width << endl;

    return 0;
}

The first program compiles fine, but of course it doesn't actually do anything so that's not too surprizing. The second one (the rectangle program that also doesn't actually do anything) doesn't compile. I get the following...

g++ classtest1.cpp Rectangle.h Rectangle.cpp -o bin/classtest1

Rectangle.cpp: In constructor ‘shapes::rectangle::rectangle(int, int)’: Rectangle.cpp:10: error: ‘weight’ was not declared in this scope Rectangle.cpp: In constructor ‘shapes::rectangle::rectangle()’: Rectangle.cpp:17: error: ‘weight’ was not declared in this scope

So, why can the first program "see" int *p_x while the second cannot see int *weight? I've been trying to figure out what I'm doing different and getting nowhere.

share|improve this question
    
I don't see it... –  Stormenet Apr 4 '11 at 6:29
2  
You shouldn't be trying to compile the header file into an object file with your g++ build command. - "g++ classtest1.cpp Rectangle.cpp -o bin/classtest1" is sufficient –  J T Apr 4 '11 at 6:42
    
You shouldn't use reserved names for your header guards - remove the underscore from the beginning. I don't think that's the cause of your problem, but it certainly could cause similar problems. –  Mike Seymour Apr 4 '11 at 11:05
    
You should use initialization list instead of the ctor code for giving the rectangle members their values. Still, this is not the origin or your problem. –  JB Jansen Apr 4 '11 at 13:11
    
Actually...J T nailed the problem on the nose. In both cases where the programs wouldn't compile were due to bad helpings of pre-compiled headers. –  cyan_jeff Apr 6 '11 at 8:31

2 Answers 2

The right syntax for Rectangle.cpp is this:

#include "Rectangle.h"
#include <cstddef>

namespace shapes {

rectangle::rectangle(int h, int w)
{
    height = h;
    width = w;
    weight = NULL;
}

rectangle::rectangle()
{
    height = 0;
    width = 0;
    weight = NULL;
}

int rectangle::area ()
{
    return height * width;
}

void rectangle::setHeight(int h)
{
    height = h;
}

void rectangle::setWidth(int w)
{
    width = w;
}

void rectangle::setDimensions(int h, int w)
{
    height = h;
    width = w;
}

} // namespace shapes

My GCC-4.4.5 and MSVC process your using namespace variant OK too. But it is not correct according to the current standard (you specify ::rectangle::area(), etc. instead of ::shapes::rectangle::area(), etc.).

share|improve this answer
    
Made the changes you suggested. Even copy/pasted your response into my editor and nothing. Still get the scope errors. ...could it be a problem with my local Debian environment? Something in lenny that's simply misconfigured 'cause everything everyone is saying is that it should compile as written. Except it's still not. –  cyan_jeff Apr 6 '11 at 7:31
    
@user690598: Try to copy "Rectangle.h" and "Rectangle.cpp" with the exact code you've posted here to a separate directory with nothing extra and compile just "Rectangle.cpp". –  Serge Dundich Apr 6 '11 at 8:04
    
That did it. I copied them to a clean directory and tried to compile. Well...without the main() entry point it didn't work. So I copied the classtest file into the directory too and tried it. It compiled. As it turns out there was a file in the original directory called Rectangle.h.gch. Once I nuked that the rectangle program compiled! Filled with new-found hope I hopped over to my SDL tutorial and looked around. CApp.h.gch! After a quick rm it compiles. Boom. Headshot. So, um...what the hell is a gch file, and why'd it have to slap me around like that? (I know...I know...TO GOOGLE). Serge+1 –  cyan_jeff Apr 6 '11 at 8:24
1  
@user690598: I think *.gch is GCC's precompiled header. –  Serge Dundich Apr 6 '11 at 8:30

You don't have errors in the code you've shown. Maybe you have a typo in int *wight declaration in Rectangle.h on your machine, but you've posted the correct code here.

share|improve this answer
    
One would argue, he posted the wrong code really :) Also I'm sure there is a type in int *wight - ... cheers –  sehe Apr 4 '11 at 6:41
    
@sehe: The code is actually correct, compiles and executes. –  ognian Apr 4 '11 at 7:07
    
I got that part –  sehe Apr 4 '11 at 8:00
    
Nope. No typoes. What you see here is what's in the files seeing as I copied and pasted them directly. I would love it to be something as simple as a typo, but I'm still getting the "error: ‘weight’ was not declared in this scope" compiler output when I run it through g++ after making Serge's changes (and/or just copying/pasting his response. Tried both). –  cyan_jeff Apr 6 '11 at 7:28
    
@user690598: Please post the compiler version and exact compiler output. –  Serge Dundich Apr 6 '11 at 7:56

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