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I have this stored procedure

CREATE PROCEDURE spGrabSerial
  @serial nvarchar(16) output
AS
BEGIN
  SET NOCOUNT ON;
  set @serial = (SELECT top 1 serial from tblSerial)
  update tblSerial set InUse = 1 where serial = @serial
END

How can I make sure that no other procedure grabs the same serial in between the select and the update?

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1  
Don't forget to check that the serial isn't in use: SELECT top 1 serial from tblSerial where InUse <> 1 –  Johan Apr 4 '11 at 9:33
    
Hehe. I just saw it myself, minor detail ;) –  Christian Wattengård Apr 4 '11 at 10:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Assuming SQL Server 2005+ you can use the OUTPUT clause to do it in one atomic operation (see Using tables as Queues).

 ;with cte as (
    select top(1) 
      serial, InUse
    from tblSerial with (rowlock, readpast)
    where InUse <> 1
    order by serial
   )
 update cte 
 set InUse = 1 
 output inserted.serial

Edit Just been reminded of a way of doing this that can assign directly to the output parameter without using the OUTPUT clause at all.

 with cte as (
    select top(1) 
      serial, InUse
    from tblSerial with (rowlock, readpast)
    where InUse <> 1
    order by serial
   )
 update cte 
 set InUse = 1, @serial = serial 
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Nice. How do I stuff the inserted.serial into the @serial output-variable? I thought SP's could only return numeric values? –  Christian Wattengård Apr 4 '11 at 10:21
1  
If you need to assign it to an OUTPUT variable and can't just use it as is then you need to OUTPUT INTO @tablevariable then assign from that. There is no syntax to assign to a scalar variable directly from OUTPUT for some reason. –  Martin Smith Apr 4 '11 at 10:35
    
Works for me :) –  Christian Wattengård Apr 4 '11 at 10:49

Make sure you run it in transaction isolation level 'Repeatable Read':

set transaction isolation level repeatable read

Then run the stored procedure in a transaction, and it'll be isolated from other changes.

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