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What is the best way to define a fixed-length SQL column (CHAR(12) for instance) through a Rails migration ?

Why this should not handled by the model is because of the performance of char() vs varchar(), and I'd like to avoid injecting raw SQL in the database.

Edit : I know the :limit modifier, however the field is still varchar (which is bad for performance) and does not allow a minimum size.

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1  
Please note that using char(n) column gives no performance boost in many RDBSes (for example in Postgres, refer their docs). What's more, char(n) does not ensure minimum length (too short strings will be padded with trailing spaces) – you should use CHECK constraint instead. –  skalee Jan 16 '12 at 11:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 29 down vote accepted

If Rails doesn’t understand the column type, it’ll pass it straight through to the database. So if you want a char instead of varchar, just replace:

t.column :token, :string

With:

t.column :token, "char(12)"

Of course, this may or may not make your migrations non-portable to another database.

(credit to http://laurelfan.com/2010/1/26/special-mysql-types-in-rails-migrations)

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 def self.up
    add_column("admin_users", "username", :string, :limit => 25)
 end

 def self.down
    remove_column("admin_users", "username")
 end
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1  
I know the :limit modifier, however the field is still varchar (which is bad for performance) and does not allow a minimum size. –  manu_v Apr 4 '11 at 9:19
    
See a section Database Mapping dizzy.co.uk/ruby_on_rails/cheatsheets/rails-migrations. As I see database field type depends on kind of database server. –  demas Apr 4 '11 at 9:24
1  
This is the most advisable solution. char(n) does not ensure minimum length (at least not in many RDBSes), you should use CHECK constraint instead. –  skalee Jan 16 '12 at 11:40

You can use string type with limit option in your migration file like this:

t.string :name, :limit => 12, :null => false
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For a database specific type, we can now use:

t.column(:column_name, 'char(12)')

And for a complete example:

class Foo < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
     create_table :foo do |t|
       t.column(:column_name, 'custom_type')

       t.timestamps
     end
  end
end
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