Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this strange problem:

I write 16 chars to a binary file and then I write 3 integers but when I open my file with some binary file viewer, I see an extra byte is added (which equals 0x0D).

Here's my code:

for(i = 0; i < 16; i++)
{
    if(i < strlen(inputStr))
    {
        myCharBuf[0] = inputStr[i];
    }
    else
    {
        myCharBuf[0] = 0;
    }

    fwrite(myCharBuf, sizeof(char), 1, myFile);
}

myIntBuf[0] = inputNumber1;

fwrite(myIntBuf, sizeof(int), 1 ,myFile);

myIntBuf[0] = inputNumber2;

fwrite(myIntBuf, sizeof(int), 1 ,myFile);

myIntBuf[0] = inputNumber3;

fwrite(myIntBuf, sizeof(int), 1 ,myFile);

I get the following byte-values:

61 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
0D 0A 00 00 00 05 00 00 00 08 00 00 00

When I expect:

61 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00
0A 00 00 00 05 00 00 00 08 00 00 00

Does anyone have an idea why it might happen?

share|improve this question

6 Answers 6

OA is the line feed character and 0D is the carriage return. These are usually associated with text mode.

Have you opened the file in binary mode? (e.g. fopen("foo.txt", "wb"))

share|improve this answer
1  
actually 0D is a carriage return, 0A is a Line Feed –  Mitch Wheat Apr 4 '11 at 10:15
    
Good point, I've edited the answer to clarify. –  Jeff Foster Apr 4 '11 at 10:16

When you open the file, open for writing as binary "wb":

fopen(filename, "wb");

When you open in text mode, translation of Line Feeds (0A) and Carriage Returns (0D) occurrs.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks! that was indeed the problem! –  M.N Apr 4 '11 at 10:18

fopen the file in binary mode with "wb".

fopen(filename, "wb");

otherwise, the code in the library will do automatic line end translation (on windows you are on Windows, are you not? that means translate '\n' to '\r' '\n').

share|improve this answer

I believe that your inputStr variable contains a newline character and it is written to the binary file as carriage return and linefeed - binary '0D' followed by '0A'.

For eg, the following program writes 16 characters and 3 numbers as follows.

FILE *fp;

    fp = fopen("sample.bin", "wb+");

    if(fp == NULL)
    {
        printf("Cannot create a file\n");
        return;
    }

    int i;
    char c[1] = {'A'};

    for(i = 0; i < 16; i++)
    {
        fwrite(c, sizeof(char), 1, fp);
        c[0]++;
    }

    int ip[1] = {1};
    fwrite(ip, sizeof(int), 1, fp);
    fwrite(ip, sizeof(int), 1, fp);
    fwrite(ip, sizeof(int), 1, fp);
    fclose(fp);

If the 'sample.bin' file is viewed using a dump program such as 'od', it gives the content as follows.

od -t x1 -c sample.bin
0000000    41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  4a  4b  4c  4d  4e  4f  50
           A   B   C   D   E   F   G   H   I   J   K   L   M   N   O   P
0000020    01  00  00  00  01  00  00  00  01  00  00  00                
         001  \0  \0  \0 001  \0  \0  \0 001  \0  \0  \0                
0000034
share|improve this answer

MS-DOS (and so today with Windows), when writing a file in text mode, adds an 0x0D before every 0x0A. In other words, it processes arbitrary data streams as they go to and from store and messes with their data - utterly, utterly insane.

Open the file in binary mode for non-insane handling.

share|improve this answer
    
You got it backwards. It adds 0x0D (nonstandard) before every 0x0A (standard). –  R.. Apr 4 '11 at 14:45
    
Curious. Why the -1? –  user82238 Apr 4 '11 at 17:00
    
@R: I'll take your word for it - I can't remember offhand which way round for it. Fixed as per your comment. –  user82238 Apr 4 '11 at 17:01

This code

    #include <stdio.h>

#define SECTORSIZE 512 // bytes per sector

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
 FILE *fp;     // filepointer
 size_t rdcnt; // num. read bytes
 unsigned char buffer[SECTORSIZE];

 if(argc < 2)
 {
  fprintf(stderr, "usage:\n\t%s device\n", argv[0]);
  return 1;
 }

 fp = fopen(argv[1], "rb");
 if(fp == NULL)
 {
  fprintf(stderr, "unable to open %s\n",argv[1]);
  return 1;
 }

 rdcnt = fread(buffer, 1, SECTORSIZE, fp);
 if(rdcnt != SECTORSIZE)
 {
  fprintf(stderr, "reading %s failed\n", argv[1]);
  fclose(fp);
  return 1;
 }

 fwrite(buffer, 1, SECTORSIZE, stdout);
 fclose(fp);
 return 0;
}

kindly taken from here https://redeaglesblog.wordpress.com/2011/04/05/sektoren-eines-datentragers-lesen/

reads the boot sector from any given disk

Pasted as it is in your preferred C (ANSI) IDE or editor, it compiles and works either in windows (mingw passing \.\PhysicalDriveX) and linux (gcc passing /dev/sdX)

But it works like a charm ONLY in Linux while it anyway inserts/adds an x0D preceding any x0A despiting the fp = fopen(argv[1], "rb");

I've compiled it from code::blocks with mingw as readsect.exe and run it reading the boot sector of my hard drive

c:\readsect.exe \\.\PhysicalDrive0 > read.bin

The file read.bin results with a lenght of 515 bytes instead than 512.

With an HEX editor able to open physical drives, I've compared my boot sector content with the read.bin one.

Well, every x0A in the physical boot sector (x0A is found 3 times), in the read.bin file is dumped as x0D + X0A. So I have three x0D, three bytes more.

Googleing, it looks like a widely reported problem.

Do any of you have found a fix? Maybe stdio.h needs a fix for the windows environment?

Thank you

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.