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We have a Maven 2 project with lots of modules in it. Example:

<modules>
  <module>common</module>
  <module>foo</module>
  <module>data</module>
  <module>bar</module>
  ... more ...
</module>

Let's say the "data" module is time consuming to build and we want to exclude it when the project is build by a CI server. Currently we use two pom.xml files to achieve this. One has all modules in it and the other one has all modules except the ones which can be left out for CI. But that's pretty annoying because sometimes we forget to put a new module into both files.

Is there a solution which doesn't need two separate module lists?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 30 down vote accepted

The easiest might be to use profiles like this:

<project>
  ...
  <modules>
    <module>common</module>
    <module>foo</module>
    <module>bar</module>
  <modules>
  ...
  <profiles>
    <profile>
      <id>expensive-modules-to-build</id>
      <modules>
        <module>data</module>
      </modules>
    </profile>
  </profiles>
</project>

You should then check out ways you can activate profiles

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Whay would you do if you need data to happen prior to common? In this case the profile modules will be placed after the default modules in reactor order. Is there a pattern for forcing order? –  Peter Kahn Jun 7 '12 at 17:33
3  
The order of module is NOT the order in which they will appear in the reactor. The only way to affect the order, is to create dependencies between modules, i.e. using the <dependency> tag. You cannot rely on the declaration order for this. –  SaM Jun 11 '12 at 12:46
2  
@SaM Actually, as of Maven 3.0.5 the Reactor will take in account the order in 'modules', although the order dictated by dependencies is of a higher priority. –  SkyDan Jul 29 '13 at 11:23
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The projects to build can also be specified on the mvn command line. This would remove the need for a separate pom, but instead you would have to change the CI configuration everytime there is a new module.

-pl,--projects <arg>                Comma-delimited list of specified
                                    reactor projects to build instead
                                    of all projects. A project can be
                                    specified by [groupId]:artifactId
                                    or by its relative path.

Maybe a combination of this flag and --also-make-dependents or --also-make would reduce this maintenance burden again.

-am,--also-make                     If project list is specified, also
                                    build projects required by the
                                    list
-amd,--also-make-dependents         If project list is specified, also
                                    build projects that depend on
                                    projects on the list
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This has the same problems as using two separate poms. We have to places where we define the modules. That's what I'm trying to avoid. –  kayahr Apr 4 '11 at 14:38
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I assume you want the default build to always build everything, regardless of speed, so that new developers can get started quickly without having to understand lots about the POM. You can use profiles like this:

<modules>
    <module>common</module>
    <module>foo</module>
    <module>bar</module>
  </modules>
  ...
  <profiles>
    <profile>
      <id>expensive-modules-to-build</id>
      <activation>
         <activeByDefault>true</activeByDefault>
      </activation>
      <modules>
        <module>data</module>
      </modules>
    </profile>
  </profiles>
</project>

The problem with this is that if a developer specifies another profile on the command line, then the expensive-modules-to-build isn't included (unless the developer also specifies it). This makes it complicated to remember which profiles need to be included.

Here is a hacky way around that. Both profiles are always included, because the pom.xml file always exists. So to exclude the expensive modules, you can use -P!full-build on the command line.

<profiles>
    <profile>
        <id>full-build</id>
        <activation>
            <file>
                <exists>pom.xml</exists>
            </file>
        </activation>
        <modules>
            <module>data</module>
        </modules>
    </profile>
    <profile>
        <id>short-build</id>
        <activation>
            <file>
                <exists>pom.xml</exists>
            </file>
        </activation>
        <modules>
           <module>common</module>
           <module>foo</module>
           <module>bar</module>
        </modules>
    </profile>
</profiles>
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Another idea: Reactor modules can be nested, so it should be possible to group your fast and slow-building modules into separate poms and then add another aggregator pom containing these two as modules. Your CI Server could then only reference the pom containing the fast building modules.

<artifactId>fast</artifactId>
<modules>
    <module>fast-a</module>
    <module>fast-b</module>
    <module>fast-c</module>
</module>

<artifactId>all</artifactId>
<modules>
    <module>fast</module>
    <module>slow</module>
</module>
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With Maven 3.2.1, you can now use -pl !<module_name>,!<module_name> to exclude certain modules from the reactor build.

See this feature request: https://jira.codehaus.org/browse/MNG-5230

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Is it safe to switch from 3.0.4 to 3.2.1 or are there larger changes? –  jan Jul 10 at 8:26
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You could be to use maven profiles. In our build environment, we created a profile quick that disables many plugins and test execution.

This is done by

    <profile>
        <id>quick</id>
        <properties>
            <skipTests>true</skipTests>
            <!-- others... -->
        </properties>   
        <build>
            <plugins>
                 <!-- configuration... -->
            </plugins>
        </build>
    </profile>

And then we invoke maven the following way

mvn groupId:artifactId:goal -P quick

You could maybe disable compilation and other standard plugins in the pom of your module to speed it up.

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1  
Yes, for disabling tests this works great. But how can I use profiles to exclude modules WITHOUT having two separate modules lists in the pom? As far as I know I need to put the full module list into one profile section and the quick-build module list into an other profile section. So this has the same problem as using two separate poms: I have two module lists to maintain. –  kayahr Apr 4 '11 at 14:40
    
Excluding module is not really the way to do things in maven and my experience with maven is that is better to stick with the way things are done, else you run in so many problems... So really what I'm proposing is not to remove the module, but to make this module less time consuming. –  Nr9 Apr 4 '11 at 14:49
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