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I'm trying to get a date range from the beginning of this month (previous year) to current day (previous year). Is there a way to simplify this code?

SELECT 'From the beginning of month to this day, previous year' AS Label,
       CONVERT (DATETIME, CAST (DATEPART(YY, GETDATE()) - 1 AS CHAR (4)) + CASE 
                                                                           WHEN DATEPART(MM, GETDATE()) < 10 THEN '-0' + CAST (DATEPART(MM, GETDATE()) AS CHAR (1)) ELSE '-' + CAST (DATEPART(MM, GETDATE()) AS CHAR (2)) 
                                                                           END + '-01') AS Begin_date,
       CONVERT (DATETIME, CAST (DATEPART(YY, GETDATE()) - 1 AS CHAR (4)) + CASE 
                                                                           WHEN DATEPART(MM, GETDATE()) < 10 THEN '-0' + CAST (DATEPART(MM, GETDATE()) AS CHAR (1)) ELSE '-' + CAST (DATEPART(MM, GETDATE()) AS CHAR (2)) 
                                                                           END + CASE 
                                                                                 WHEN DATEPART(DD, GETDATE()) < 10 THEN '-0' + CAST (DATEPART(DD, GETDATE()) AS CHAR (1)) ELSE '-' + CAST (DATEPART(DD, GETDATE()) AS CHAR (2)) 
                                                                                 END) AS End_date
share|improve this question
    
The begin_date should be '20100401'? –  Longha Apr 4 '11 at 14:02
    
Yes, that was the purpose. –  tesmp Apr 4 '11 at 14:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted
SELECT  'Anything' as Label
        ,DATEADD(month, DATEDIFF(month, 0, GETDATE()), 0) as firstdaythismonth
        ,DATEADD(day, DATEDIFF(day, 0, GETDATE()), 0) as today
        ,DATEADD(year, -1, DATEADD(month, DATEDIFF(month, 0, GETDATE()), 0)) as firstdaythismonth_lastyear
        ,DATEADD(year, -1, DATEADD(day, DATEDIFF(day, 0, GETDATE()), 0)) as today_lastyear
share|improve this answer
    
Oohh... A bit late I see. –  Johan Apr 4 '11 at 14:08
    
+1 : Use of DateAdd and DateDiff are preferred to Convert, in my opinion. It yields a consistent and flexible approach. –  MatBailie Apr 4 '11 at 14:11
    
@Dems: Thanks, thats my opinon too. –  Johan Apr 4 '11 at 14:20
SELECT 
     DATEADD(yy, -1, CONVERT(VARCHAR(25),
     DATEADD(dd,-(DAY(GETDATE())-1),GETDATE()),101)) AS Date_Value,
     'First Day of Current Month Of Last Year' AS Date_Type
UNION
SELECT 
     DATEADD(yy, -1, GETDATE()) AS TodayLastYear, 'Today Last Year'

Or if you just want the values and no description

SELECT 
     DATEADD(yy, -1, CONVERT(VARCHAR(25),
     DATEADD(dd,-(DAY(GETDATE())-1),GETDATE()),101))
UNION
SELECT 
     DATEADD(yy, -1, GETDATE()) AS TodayLastYear

You use DATEADD and specify yy to subtract years. Just use a negative value.

I'll also share a set of common date functions I use. Just create this as a table valued function:

set ANSI_NULLS ON
set QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
go

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[udfCommonDates] (@date datetime)
RETURNS @t table (week_start datetime,
                  week_end datetime,
                  lastweek_start datetime,
                  lastweek_end datetime,
                  month_start datetime,
                  month_end datetime,
                  lastmonth_start datetime,
                  lastmonth_end datetime,
                  yesterday_start datetime,
                  yesterday_end datetime,
                  today_start datetime,
                  today_end datetime,
                  thisweek_monday_start datetime,
                  thisweek_monday_end datetime,
                  year_start datetime,
                  year_end datetime,
                  tomorrow_noon datetime,
                  today_noon datetime,
                  date_only datetime)
BEGIN
   INSERT @t
   SELECT
   dbo.get_week_start ( @date ) AS week_start,
   dbo.get_week_end   ( @date ) AS week_end,
   dbo.get_week_start ( DATEADD(d, -7, @date ) ) AS lastweek_start,
   dbo.get_week_end   ( DATEADD(d, -7, @date ) ) AS lastweek_end,
   dbo.get_month_start( @date ) AS month_start,
   dbo.get_month_end  ( @date ) AS month_end,
   dbo.get_month_start ( DATEADD(m,-1, @date) ) AS lastmonth_start,
   dbo.get_month_end  ( DATEADD(m,-1,@date) ) AS lastmonth_end,
   dbo.get_yesterday_start ( @date ) AS yesterday_start,
   dbo.get_yesterday_end ( @date ) AS yesterday_end,
   dbo.get_today_start (@date) AS today_start,
   dbo.get_today_end ( @date ) AS today_end,
   dbo.get_weekday_start(1,@date) AS thisweek_monday_start,
   dbo.get_weekday_end(1,@date) AS thisweek_monday_end,
   dbo.get_year_start(@date) AS year_start,
   dbo.get_year_end(@date) AS year_end,  
   dbo.get_tomorrow_noon(@date) AS TomorrowNoon,
   dbo.get_today_noon(@date) AS TodayNoon,
   dbo.get_date_only(@date) AS DateOnly
RETURN
END

Here are the scalar valued functions for these:

    CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[get_date_only] (@date datetime)
    RETURNS datetime
    WITH SCHEMABINDING, RETURNS NULL ON NULL INPUT
    AS    
    BEGIN
        RETURN dateadd(day, DateDiff(day, 0, GetDate()), 0)
    END
    GO

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[get_month_end] (@date datetime)
RETURNS datetime
WITH SCHEMABINDING, RETURNS NULL ON NULL INPUT
AS    
BEGIN
   RETURN dateadd(ms, -3, dateadd (m,datediff(m,0,
          dateadd(m,1,@date)),0))
END
GO

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[get_month_start] (@date datetime)
RETURNS datetime
WITH SCHEMABINDING, RETURNS NULL ON NULL INPUT
AS    
BEGIN
   RETURN dateadd(m,datediff(m,0, @date),0)
   END
GO

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[get_today_end] (@today datetime)
RETURNS datetime
WITH SCHEMABINDING, RETURNS NULL ON NULL INPUT
AS    
BEGIN
   return dateadd(ms, -3, datediff(d,0,dateadd(d,1,@today)))
END
GO

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[get_today_noon](@date datetime)
RETURNS datetime
WITH SCHEMABINDING, RETURNS NULL ON NULL INPUT
AS    BEGIN
   RETURN DATEADD(hh, 12, DATEADD(d,DATEDIFF(d,0, @date),0))
END
GO

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[get_today_start] (@today datetime)
RETURNS datetime 
WITH SCHEMABINDING, RETURNS NULL ON NULL INPUT
AS    BEGIN
   return dateadd(day, 0, datediff(d,0,@today))
END
GO

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[get_tomorrow_noon](@date datetime)
RETURNS datetime
WITH SCHEMABINDING, RETURNS NULL ON NULL INPUT
AS    BEGIN
   RETURN DATEADD(hh, 12, DATEADD(d,DATEDIFF(d,-1, @date),0))
END
GO

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[get_week_end] (@date datetime)
RETURNS datetime
WITH SCHEMABINDING, RETURNS NULL ON NULL INPUT
AS    BEGIN
   return dateadd(yyyy, datepart(yyyy,
      dateadd(weekday,7-datepart(weekday, @date),@date))-1900, 0)
    + dateadd(ms, -3,
      dateadd(dy, datepart(dy,
     dateadd(weekday,7-datepart(weekday, @date),@date)),0) )
END
GO

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[get_week_start] (@date datetime)
RETURNS datetime
WITH SCHEMABINDING, RETURNS NULL ON NULL INPUT
AS    BEGIN
   return dateadd(yyyy, datepart(yyyy,
      dateadd(weekday,1-datepart(weekday, @date),@date))-1900, 0)
    + dateadd(dy, datepart(dy,
      dateadd(weekday,1-datepart(weekday, @date),@date))-1,0)
END
GO

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[get_weekday_end] (@weekday tinyint,
                                 @date datetime)
RETURNS datetime
WITH SCHEMABINDING, RETURNS NULL ON NULL INPUT
AS    BEGIN
   return dateadd(yyyy, datepart(yyyy,
      dateadd(weekday,@weekday-
      datepart(weekday, @date),@date))-1900, 0)
    + dateadd(ms, -3,
      dateadd(dy, datepart(dy,
      dateadd(weekday,@weekday-datepart(weekday, @date),
                                        @date)),0) )
END
GO

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[get_weekday_start] (@weekday tinyint,
                                   @date datetime)
RETURNS datetime
WITH SCHEMABINDING, RETURNS NULL ON NULL INPUT
AS    BEGIN
   return dateadd(yyyy, datepart(yyyy,
      dateadd(weekday,@weekday-
      datepart(weekday, @date),@date))-1900, 0)
    + dateadd(dy, datepart(dy,
      dateadd(weekday,@weekday-datepart(weekday, @date),
                                        @date))-1,0)
END
GO

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[get_year_end] (@date datetime)
RETURNS datetime
WITH SCHEMABINDING, RETURNS NULL ON NULL INPUT
AS    BEGIN
RETURN DATEADD(year, DATEDIFF(year, 0, GetDate())+1, 0)-1
END
GO

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[get_year_start] (@date datetime)
RETURNS datetime
WITH SCHEMABINDING, RETURNS NULL ON NULL INPUT
AS    BEGIN
   RETURN DATEADD(year,DATEDIFF(year,0, @date),0)
END
GO

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[get_yesterday_end] (@today datetime)
RETURNS datetime
WITH SCHEMABINDING, RETURNS NULL ON NULL INPUT
AS    BEGIN
   return dateadd(ms, -3, datediff(d,0,@today))
END
GO

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[get_yesterday_start] (@today datetime)
RETURNS datetime
WITH SCHEMABINDING, RETURNS NULL ON NULL INPUT
AS    BEGIN
   RETURN dateadd(day, -1, datediff(d,0,@today))
END
GO

These were really helpful for me because I used this in reporting services for date parameters. You could simply create a dataset referencing this table function and then use these in the parameters for any datetime within RS.

You could execute this entire table-valued function like so:

SELECT * FROM [MyDB].[dbo].[udfCommonDates] (GetDate())

The result is like so

enter image description here

For Reporting Services Folks

Now I mentioned earlier that I use these for reporting services. Now the RS folks might be thinking but how does this help me as I need a dataset and a dataset can only be based on a Stored Procedure or a direct table. No problem create the following stored procedure:

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[uspCommonDates] AS
begin
   set datefirst 1
   declare @date datetime
   set @date = getdate()
   select * from dbo.udfCommonDates(@date)
end

Now you've got a stored procedure to use as a dataset...Now in reporting services add a new dataset:

enter image description here

Now go to the report parameters section of the report:

enter image description here

Now pick that dataset dsFunctions (or whatever you called it) and then pick any of the value fields from the scalar functions such as:

enter image description here

Now when you run the report it uses the scalars:

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
@martin - be patient I am editing. –  JonH Apr 4 '11 at 14:22
1  
@Martin - added. –  JonH Apr 4 '11 at 14:26
    
@JonH - Some of your functions don't use the input date, but getdate() –  Johan Apr 4 '11 at 14:33
    
@Johan - That's very normal, when you are looking for the year end, for example, it doesn't matter what date you use during the calendar year. You could just as well use @date for that particular one. –  JonH Apr 4 '11 at 14:35
1  
@Martin - I agree –  JonH Apr 4 '11 at 14:45

You can use the DATEADD functions to help:

 SELECT 'From the beginning of month to this day, previous year' AS Label,
DATEADD(YY,-1,DATEADD(DD,-(day(getdate())-1),DATEDIFF(dd, 0, GETDATE()))) AS Begin_date,
DATEADD(YY,-1,DATEDIFF(dd, 0, GETDATE()))  AS End_date
share|improve this answer
    
This gives '20110401' for begin_date –  Longha Apr 4 '11 at 14:12
    
I see your point, one sec. Now corrected. –  PCurd Apr 4 '11 at 14:13

For 2010-04-01 , 2010-04-04 how about;

SELECT 
CAST(DATEADD(DAY, -365 + -(DAY(GETDATE())-1), GETDATE()) AS DATE), 
CAST(DATEADD(YEAR, -1, GETDATE()) AS DATE)  
share|improve this answer
1  
K. - Doesn't work for leap years. –  JonH Apr 4 '11 at 14:05
    
29-feb would return as 28-feb for lys as far as I can see –  Alex K. Apr 4 '11 at 14:09
    
Your solution wont work for March 2012 - Feb 2013. Try it. It would say first day of month is the 2nd. –  Johan Apr 4 '11 at 14:25
    
Sorry I didn't mean to be picky, but in some applications just one day being off causes everything to go haywire. In most cases your solution is good enough, depending on the state of the application. The only reason I bring it up is I've seen code that use constant numbers like 365 (days in a year) but the issue is we don't live in such a perfect world :). –  JonH Apr 4 '11 at 15:00
    
no, your completely correct, I just wrote the -day offset & thought taking off another 365 right there would be simpler without considering the leap years! –  Alex K. Apr 4 '11 at 16:56
SELECT  'From the beginning of month to this day, previous year' AS Label,
        CONVERT(DATETIME,LEFT(CONVERT(VARCHAR(6),DATEADD(YEAR,-1,GETDATE()),112),6)+'01') Begin_date,
        DATEADD(YEAR,-1,GETDATE()) End_date
share|improve this answer
    
I dont like the string casting/concateration/substring and specific date format you have to use in your solution. –  Johan Apr 4 '11 at 14:13

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