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This is a slight variance of this question: Possible to use a singleton with a non-default constructor in C#?

I have a class that takes parameters for it's constructor. I would like to make this singleton such that the parameters are taken upon initialising the singleton and thus would not need to be passed in each time the instance is retrieved.

My solution (which is not elegant) for this is to have a CreateInstance() static method that takes the parameters and constructs the singleton instance. I would then have another static method GetInstance() which would be parameterless to obtain the singleton instance. In code, I would then need to ensure the logic calls CreateInstance before any calls to GetInstance. However, I cannot enforce this at compile time. I can, however, check at runtime by throwing an exception in GetInstance if it is called before CreateInstance.

Is there anyway I can achieve this behaviour with compile time enforcement? Or at the very least, is there a better way of doing the same thing?

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@user691226 could you should some code for how you've done this already, I may have some pointers. –  msarchet Apr 4 '11 at 14:22

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There is no way to do it at compile time, because that would be like asking the compiler "can you prove that code X is never executed before code Y is executed, in the presence of multiple threads?". It cannot be done.

As for the runtime behavior of your design, I think this is as good as it can ever be.

You can make it slightly better by exposing a Func<SingletonType> property in your singleton class. When someone asks for the singleton instance and the instance has not already been created, your class would call this "factory method" to construct the singleton. If the factory method is null, then you either throw an exception or (if applicable) construct using some default parameters.

What this does is essentially defer the construction of the singleton until it's actually needed for the first time, so it's some improvement. But the underlying principle is the same.

Update:

As LukeH points out, this is pretty much what Lazy<T> does (.NET 4 only). If possible, use that one instead of writing your own.

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Thanks for the reply. I guess I was hoping that I might have missed a completely different way of achieving the same behaviour that gives me compile time checking. –  millie Apr 4 '11 at 14:29
2  
You've described pretty much how Lazy<T> works: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd642331.aspx –  LukeH Apr 4 '11 at 14:34
    
@LukeH: Thanks for the tip, I 've never used that one so far. –  Jon Apr 4 '11 at 14:37

In a classic singleton, the real magic happens in static readonly which creates the instance as soon as it is used:

public class MySingleton
{
    private static readonly _instance = new MySingleton();

    private MySingleton() {}

    public static MySingleton Instance
    {
        get
        {
            return _instance;
        }
    }

}

If you have parameters to pass to constructor, you have to implement locking yourself (note the double if sandwitching the lock):

public class MySingletonWithConstructor
{
    private static _instance;
    private static object _lock = new Object();

    private MySingletonWithConstructor(string myArg) 
    {
        // ... do whatever necessary
    }

    public static MySingletonWithConstructor Instance
    {
        get
        {
            if(_instance==null)
            {
                lock(_lock)
                {
                    if(_instance==null) // double if to prevent race condition
                    {
                        _instance = new MySingletonWithConstructor("Something");
                    }
                }
            }
            return _instance;
        }
    }

}
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+1 Nice... I never would have thought of that double if construct, and it took me about a minute to understand it. Simple and effective. –  corlettk Apr 30 '11 at 11:38

You could just have GetInstance() call the CreateInstance() method if the singleton object doesn't exist already.

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1  
You can't do this because GetInstance doesn't have the parameters that CreateInstance needs. –  millie Apr 4 '11 at 14:24
    
Can you determine what the would need to be –  msarchet Apr 4 '11 at 14:26

I would do it similar to this. You may have to add locks or other things to ensure:

 public class ClassA {     
    private static ClassA instance;

    private int param;

    private ClassA(int param) {
       this.param = param;
    }

    public static ClassA getInstance() {
       if (instance == null) {
          throw new CustomException("Not yet initialised");
       } else {
          return instance;
       }
    }

    public static void createInstance(int param) {
       if (instance == null) {
          instance = new ClassA(param);
       }
    }
}
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1  
Yes, this is the code I already have. Unfortunately the question was whether I can change the runtime enforcement of this behaviour to compile time behaviour. But it doesn't seem possible. –  millie Apr 4 '11 at 14:31
    
Oh sorry I misunderstood your question. But no, you can't. I think this is more or less the only way to do it. –  anon Apr 4 '11 at 14:33

In your GetInstance() method, why dont you just call CreateInstance if your value is null, then you have lazy initialisation..

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Because he needs to pass arguments to the CreateInstance function. This doesn't provide a solution to the question that was asked. –  Cody Gray Apr 4 '11 at 14:29
    
Where is he getting these magical arguments from if they are not passed into GetInstance, since none are passed into GetInstance i assumed they would be known at this point.. –  Richard Friend Apr 4 '11 at 14:33
    
The question already addresses this: "My solution (which is not elegant) for this is to have a CreateInstance() static method that takes the parameters and constructs the singleton instance. I would then have another static method GetInstance() which would be parameterless to obtain the singleton instance." –  Cody Gray Apr 4 '11 at 14:34
    
Okay i really mis-read the question, it is monday after all. –  Richard Friend Apr 4 '11 at 14:38

Use CreateInstance() to be the loader of a Lazy<T> and have GetInstance return the Lazy.Value (you might want to create a static readonly field that is set to = thelazy.Value to ensure a single entry into CreateInstance())

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