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If we consider two registers ax and bx, how do we swap their contents in Intel IA-32 just by using push and pop? I'm not allowed to use xchg.

This is not question for a homework, I'm revising for an exam.

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Had you spent some time thinking about the solution instead posting such a poor question, you probably already had the solution. –  Ingo Apr 4 '11 at 15:05
    
I'm sorry I posted a poor question, but I didn't know I could pop the stack directly to a register. I knew how to work with the stack, in Java, but didn't know it worked the same way here. –  Sorin Cioban Apr 4 '11 at 15:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can either push once and use a mov instruction, or push twice. First one goes like:

push ax
mov ax, bx
pop bx

If you want to push twice, it is (as answered by others):

push ax
push bx
pop ax
pop bx
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Thanks a lot :) –  Sorin Cioban Apr 4 '11 at 15:21
push ax
push bx
pop ax
pop bx

?

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Thanks :) I didn't know I could pop directly to a register. –  Sorin Cioban Apr 4 '11 at 15:20

Should be standard use of a stack. Push A, Push B, Pop to A, Pop to B.

This works for IA-32 because its pop doesn't just pop the stack, it also delivers the value it pops. This is not always the case. The Standard Template Library for C++ has a pop that just manipulates the stack and you need a different command to access the top of the stack

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Well you can't compare an assembly operation with a generic method in a library of some high-level language. –  KennyTM Apr 4 '11 at 15:16
    
I believe I did. I was referring to the variety of ways pop is represented out in the wild. It was a cautionary advice. –  Tom Murphy Apr 4 '11 at 15:58

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