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I've placed some very basic code below of what I'm trying to do. I have the 'DoSomethingAshnc' method that performs an Asynchronous operation. I would like the 'DoSomething' method to be a Synchronous method that doesn't take in the action parameter and returns an int.

public void DoSomething(Action<int> actionToPerformOnComplete)
    {
        DoSomethingAsync(delegate(int val)
            {
                actionToPerformOnComplete(val);
            });
    }

Is it even possible to have 'DoSomething' return an integer as if the method was happening synchronously?

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You could wrap it in a thread and block until you get a response... –  Nix Apr 4 '11 at 15:25
1  
That's why we are waiting in excitement for C#5.0 async / await (or use the Async CTP already). –  Marcel Jackwerth Apr 4 '11 at 15:29
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4 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You'd need to add something in the end of your sync method, to tell it to wait for the other call to finish. I'm assuming your async method will have an event on to tell the caller when it's finished.

If so then I'd suggest using something like a ManualResetEvent, waiting on it in your sync thread, and set it in the Finish event receiver for the async one.

Example:

public void DoSomething(Action<int> actionToPerformOnComplete)
{
   ManualResetEvent mre = new ManualResetEvent(false);
   DoSomethingAsync(delegate(int val)
   {
      try
      {
         actionToPerformOnComplete(val);
      }
      finally
      {
         mre.Set();
      }
   });
   mre.WaitOne();
}
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You should probably use mre.WaitOne(TimeSpan) so you can handle the case where the asynchronous event fails to call Set. If that happens, and mre.Set() is never called your code will hang forever. –  Jonathan Beerhalter Apr 4 '11 at 15:37
    
Indeed, that's true. I'll update my code slightly, so you don't need to add the timespan. Although using the TimeSpan's fine, if you don't need to figure out the maximum execution time, even better. –  Ian Apr 4 '11 at 15:38
    
You're right. You're code is much better than the time span. In fact, that pattern had never dawned on me. I'm going to go do a little refactoring now.... –  Jonathan Beerhalter Apr 4 '11 at 15:44
    
Exactly what I needed! Thanks :) –  JSprang Apr 4 '11 at 17:45
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As others have mentioned, you need to wait for your async method to finish. To do that without passing that Action parameter to your method, use this code:

public int DoSomething()
{
   int result;
   ManualResetEvent mre = new ManualResetEvent(false);
   DoSomethingAsync(val => {result = val; mre.Set(); });
   mre.WaitOne();
   return result;
}

This executes the async method, waits for it to finish and assigns the result to a local variable. This result is returned.

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Yes. All you have to do is to put this line of code:

IAsyncResult asycn = ... // make a call to Async and get back IAsyncResult 
while(!asycn.IsCompleted)
{
   Thread.Sleep( ....);
}

UPDATE

Just as some asked, a correctly designed async operation will implement async pattern MSDN:

An asynchronous operation that uses the IAsyncResult design pattern is implemented as two methods named BeginOperationName and EndOperationName that begin and end the asynchronous operation OperationName respectively. For example, the FileStream class provides the BeginRead and EndRead methods to asynchronously read bytes from a file. These methods implement the asynchronous version of the Read method.

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Isn't a ManualResetEvent the better choice here? –  Daniel Hilgarth Apr 4 '11 at 15:27
1  
Though isn't Thread.Sleep() a blocking method? Thought it was better not to use it where possible. –  Ian Apr 4 '11 at 15:27
    
Yes, it is blocking - as blocking as ManualResetEvent, no more and no less - and it is the point, he wants to wait for it to finish. –  Aliostad Apr 4 '11 at 15:30
    
I didn't mean blocking in that sense. For example on a UI Thread using Thread.Sleep blocks the message pump, I'm not sure that ManualResetEvent does. –  Ian Apr 4 '11 at 15:35
1  
This makes me wonder where you got the information that DoSomethingAsync even returned something (let alone IAsyncResult).. :) –  sehe Apr 4 '11 at 15:43
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using System;
using System.Threading;

namespace qqq
{
    class Program
    {
        public static void DoAsync(Action<int> whenDone)
        {
            new Thread(o => { Thread.Sleep(3000); whenDone(42); }).Start();
        }

        static public int Do()
        {
            var mre = new ManualResetEvent(false);

            int retval = 0;
            DoAsync(i => { retval = i; mre.Set(); });

            if (mre.WaitOne())
                return retval;
            throw new ApplicationException("Unexpected error");
        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(Do());
        }
    }
}
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