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I have a flags enum defined like this:

[Flags]
public enum MyEnum
{
    None =     0x00,
    Choice1 =  0x01,
    Choice2 =  0x02,
    Choice3 =  0x04,
    Default =  Choice1 | Choice2,
    All =      Default | Choice3
}

I would like a way to print out which flags are included in MyEnum.Default. In this case, I'd want the output to be something like "Choice1, Choice2".

The problem with simply printing MyEnum.Default.ToString() is that the output would be "Default" when I want "Choice1, Choice2".

Here's one option, but if I used this I'd have to update the printing every time I changed the enum.

((StudyData.Choice1 & StudyData.Default) == StudyData.Choice1 ? StudyData.Choice1.ToString() : "") + ", " +
((StudyData.Choice2 & StudyData.Default) == StudyData.Choice2 ? StudyData.Choice2.ToString() : "") + ", " +
((StudyData.Choice3 & StudyData.Default) == StudyData.Choice3 ? StudyData.Choice3.ToString() : "")

Does anyone have a cleaner way of doing this? Ideally, I'd like a way of printing out the flags included in MyEnum.Default without having to change the printing code every time I added a new flag or changed the default.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Using the extension methods I've written here on a related question, this should be simple:

var value = MyEnum.Default;
var str = String.Join(", ", value.GetIndividualFlags());
// "Choice1, Choice2"

And here's the extension methods:

static class EnumExtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<Enum> GetFlags(this Enum value)
    {
        return GetFlags(value, Enum.GetValues(value.GetType()).Cast<Enum>().ToArray());
    }

    public static IEnumerable<Enum> GetIndividualFlags(this Enum value)
    {
        return GetFlags(value, GetFlagValues(value.GetType()).ToArray());
    }

    private static IEnumerable<Enum> GetFlags(Enum value, Enum[] values)
    {
        ulong bits = Convert.ToUInt64(value);
        List<Enum> results = new List<Enum>();
        for (int i = values.Length - 1; i >= 0; i--)
        {
            ulong mask = Convert.ToUInt64(values[i]);
            if (i == 0 && mask == 0L)
                break;
            if ((bits & mask) == mask)
            {
                results.Add(values[i]);
                bits -= mask;
            }
        }
        if (bits != 0L)
            return Enumerable.Empty<Enum>();
        if (Convert.ToUInt64(value) != 0L)
            return results.Reverse<Enum>();
        if (bits == Convert.ToUInt64(value) && values.Length > 0 && Convert.ToUInt64(values[0]) == 0L)
            return values.Take(1);
        return Enumerable.Empty<Enum>();
    }

    private static IEnumerable<Enum> GetFlagValues(Type enumType)
    {
        ulong flag = 0x1;
        foreach (var value in Enum.GetValues(enumType).Cast<Enum>())
        {
            ulong bits = Convert.ToUInt64(value);
            if (bits == 0L)
                //yield return value;
                continue; // skip the zero value
            while (flag < bits) flag <<= 1;
            if (flag == bits)
                yield return value;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Nice... and shamelessly stolen for future reference. – Pete M Apr 4 '11 at 19:06

Decorate your enum with [FlagsAttribute]. It does pretty much exactly what you're after:

[FlagsAttribute]
public enum FooNum
{
    foo = 0,
    bar = 1,
    lulz = 2,
    borkbork = 4
}

FooNum f = FooNum.bar | FooNum.borkbork;

Debug.WriteLine(f.ToString());

should give you:

bar, borkbork

share|improve this answer
    
Oops! I forgot to include the FlagsAttribute in my copy-paste. I'm going to fix the original question. Thanks for the fast response and sorry for the confusion... – Brian Apr 4 '11 at 18:48
1  
Ohhhh... I see what you're doing now. The problem with this one is even if you manually construct the Default with yourEnum = yourEnum.Choice1 | yourEnum.Choice2 you will STILL get yourEnum.Default when you push it out to a string. How badly do you need the Default and All definitions on the enum itself? You're going to have to walk the bits and pull them separately like you've already found out. It's going to be a little messy no matter what. A different option would be to store your defaults as their own FooNum. That's messy in its own way though... – Pete M Apr 4 '11 at 19:04
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

using System.Text;

namespace printStar
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {


            Console.WriteLine("Enter the value ");
            int k = int.Parse(Console.ReadLine());
            int n = k - 1;
            int x = 2 * (k - 1) + 1;

            for (int p = 0; p <= n; p++)
            {
                for (int j = k - 1; j >= 0; j--)
                {
                    Console.Write(" ");
                }

                for (int i = 0; i <= (x - 2 * (k - 1)); i++)
                {
                    if (i % 2 == 1)
                    {
                        Console.Write("*");
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        Console.Write(" ");
                    }
                }

                Console.WriteLine();
                k--;
            }
            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
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