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can we make iPhone application without submitting it on app store .because the client do not want to make it public but he want to install it on iPhone of their company employees?


Q:1:->After registering for iOS Enterprise Distribution they will provide us any certificate and then using this certificate ,i am supposed to make a provisioning profile so i want know that For wireless enterprise distribution, do we still need a list of UDIDs for a provisioning file?

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possible duplicate of Private iPhone App, without App Store? –  Brad Larson Apr 5 '11 at 17:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, check out Apple's guide on Distributing Enterprise Apps:

Commercial apps can be purchased, downloaded, and installed by users through the App Store. But if you develop an enterprise app that you want to distribute only to your employees, the app must be digitally signed with a certificate issued by Apple through the Developer Enterprise Program. You must also have an enterprise distribution provisioning profile that allows a device to use the app. Without a valid provisioning profile, the app won’t open.

The process for deploying an in-house apps is:

  • Register for the iOS Developer Enterprise Program.
  • Prepare your app for distribution.
  • Create an enterprise distribution provisioning profile that authorizes devices to use apps you’ve signed.
  • Build the app with the provisioning profile.
  • Deploy the app to your users.
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thanku david barry for your help. –  Rohit Dhawan Apr 4 '11 at 20:50
    
For wireless enterprise distribution, do we still need a list of UDIDs for a provisioning file? –  Rohit Dhawan Apr 7 '11 at 17:59

I know that most people aren't comfortable with jailbreaking their iPhones but I was under the impression that any app can be installed if your phone is jailbroken.

This probably won't apply to the original poster's situation but somebody else might find this info useful.

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