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I have the following problem:

//class XmlObject is part of org.apache.xmlbeans
public class DepartmentType extends XmlObject; // getName method is defined in this class
public class OrganizatiopnType extends XmlObject; // getName method is defined in this class

XmlObject department = null;
if (a == 1)
    department = (DepartmentType) order.getDepartment(); // returns DepartmentType
else
    department = (OrganizationType) order.getOrganization(); // returns OrganizationType

department.getName(); // throws cannot find symbol
// ... and do some other complex stuff using methods which are defined in both classes ...

What is the cleanest way to call the getName() method?

UPDATE 1:
Cybernate, your approach seems the most logical, if you have control over the DepartmentType & OrganizationType. Unfortunately, these objects are generated from XML schema by xmlbeans. In my case, I could redesign the schema, so that both types have common base.

But what if I wouldn't have the control over the schema. How could I implement the basic idea?

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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you have control of your schema you can define a base abstract type that your other types can extend from. I haven't tried this myself so I'm not sure how it XmlBeans will handle it.

<complexType name="NamedEntity" abstract="true">
    <sequence>
        <element name="name" type="string"/>
    </sequence>
</complexType>

<complexType name="DepartmentType">
    <complexContent>
        <extension base="NamedEntity">
            <sequence>
                <element name="whatever"/>
            </sequence>
        </extension>
    </complexContent>
</complexType>

Otherwise, it's a work-around (hack?) but you could use Commons BeanUtils provided your generated classes follow JavaBean naming convention. If these objects are getting passed around a lot you could create a wrapper class to make the calls a little more concrete.

public class Department {
    XmlObject obj;

    public Department(XmlObject obj){
        if(!obj instanceof DepartmentType || !obj instanceof OrganizatiopnType){
            throw new IllegalArgumentException();
        }
        this.obj = obj;
    }

    public String getName(){
        return (String)PropertyUtils.getProperty(obj, "name");
    }
}

Any problem can be solved with another layer of indirection.....except too much indirection.

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I suggest you make both classes implement a common interface, and cast to that instead. I can't see that your current casts can have any effect...

public interface NamedElement
{
    String getName();
}

...

NamedElement department = a == 1 ? order.getDepartment() : 
                                   order.getOrganisation();
String name = department.getName();

This is assuming you have control over the DepartmentType and OrganizationType code, of course.

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That's the problem, I don't have control over the DepartmentType & OrganizationType, they are generated externaly by xmlbeans from XSD. –  zeldi Apr 4 '11 at 21:12
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Note: This is an alternative to the current class hierarchy you have.

Define a intermdeiate class called UnitTypeBase which extends from XmlObject. Something like

public class UnitTypeBase extends XmlObject{
 public String getName(){
  //Some implementaition or you can mark it as abstract
 }
}

then derive *DepartmentType and OrganizationType* from UnitTypeBase

//class XmlObject is part of org.apache.xmlbeans 
public class DepartmentType extends UnitTypeBase; // getName method is defined in this class 
public class OrganizatiopnType extends UnitTypeBase; // getName method is defined in this class  
UnitTypeBase department = null; 
if (a == 1)     
  department = (DepartmentType) order.getDepartment(); // returns DepartmentType 
else     
     department = (OrganizationType) order.getOrganization(); // returns OrganizationType  
department.getName(); 
     // ... and do some other complex stuff using methods which are defined in both classes ... 
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I would suggest an interface instead of an intermediate class - that way if there have to be two such interfaces across different sets of classes, it'll work just fine. –  Jon Skeet Apr 4 '11 at 19:06
    
@Jon: Yes, it all depends on the context.. and if the getName needs to be across different sets of classes interface based approach would be better. –  Chandu Apr 4 '11 at 19:07
    
what if I don't have control over the types (they are generated externaly)? –  zeldi Apr 4 '11 at 21:18
    
@zeldi: If you don't have control over the types then all of the solutions mentioned here are off the table. You have to then hard code the checks on each type... cast it accordingly and then call getName method... I will wait to see if someone has a better suggestion. –  Chandu Apr 4 '11 at 21:27
    
I did go with the Adam B's solution, but I'd still like to hear about your alternative solution. –  zeldi Apr 18 '11 at 20:15
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Create an interface with method getName and both classes DepartmentType and OrganizationType implements this interface. Such as ;

public class IName {
   public void getName();
}

public class DepartmentType extends XmlObject implements IName {}

public class OrganizationType extends XmlObject implements IName {}

IName department = null;
if (a==1)
  department = order.getDepartment();
else
 department = order.getOrganization();
String name = department.getName();
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