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I've been trying to break a sample file as below such that the third column becomes two parts while maintaining order within the file.

100 400 500.00APPLE 5.8 9.2

200 300 600.00DOG 5.3 9.1

300 763 454.44KITTEN 5.7 9.2

Should result in

100 400 500.00 APPLE 5.8 9.2

200 300 600.00 DOG 5.3 9.1

300 763 454.44 KITTEN 5.7 9.2

Any suggestions? I've toyed doing this in awk but seem to be having issues.

PS: The point upon which to separate is always a digit [0-9] followed by [a-zA-Z] in regex.

Thanks!

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try:

sed 's/\([0-9]\)\([A-Z]\)/\1 \2/' ./infile

Proof of Concept

$ sed 's/\([0-9]\)\([A-Z]\)/\1 \2/' ./infile
100 400 500.00 APPLE 5.8 9.2
200 300 600.00 DOG 5.3 9.1
300 763 454.44 KITTEN 5.7 9.2

Or if you have gawk you can limit the split to just the 3rd field by using:

awk '{$3=gensub(/([0-9])([A-Z])/,"\\1 \\2","",$3)}1' ./infile

Proof of Concept

$ awk '{$3=gensub(/([0-9])([A-Z])/,"\\1 \\2","",$3)}1' ./infile
100 400 500.00 APPLE 5.8 9.2
200 300 600.00 DOG 5.3 9.1
300 763 454.44 KITTEN 5.7 9.2
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Amazing. Thanks. I kind of figured it could be done in sed... it took me some glances and reading of gnu.org/software/sed/manual/sed.html to see how your solution works but understand it now. –  jparanich Apr 4 '11 at 19:48
    
@jp: no problem. Note that the sed script will split the first occurrence of a number followed by a letter. If you have lines where this pattern occurs in the 1st or 2nd field, it will split that. If you want to be sure the split only happens on the 3rd field then the awk script is the way to go. –  SiegeX Apr 4 '11 at 19:52
    
For understanding sake, say I wanted to extend this to one step further, putting # signs in place of the spaces, but ONLY between digits. ie. 100 400 500.00 APPLE 5.8 9.2 becomes 100#400#500.00 APPLE 5.8#9.2. I'm trying to understand the \1 and \2 better but obviously it only matches first,second occurrence. It would be nice if sed supported more sophisticated temp variable-like holders (but maybe it does?). Thanks again. –  jparanich Apr 4 '11 at 19:57
    
Ahh got it s/([0-9]) ([0-9])/\1#\2/g –  jparanich Apr 4 '11 at 20:22
    
Or all in one pass: sed -e 's/ /#/g' -e 's/\([0-9]\)\([A-Z]\)/\1 \2/' file –  glenn jackman Apr 5 '11 at 1:59
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