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I kinda know what polymorphism is but failed to understand it clearly. Also my code is following:

class Human
{
   public virtual void CleanTheRoom()
   {
   }
}
class Woman:Human
{
   public override void CleanTheRoom()
   {
     //women clean faster
   }
}
class Man:Human
{
   public override void CleanTheRoom()
   {
     //men clean slower, different code here
   }
}
class Child:Human
{
   public override void CleanTheRoom()
   {
     //empty ... children are lazy :)
   }
}

Should I explain this is polymorhism because all derived classes from base class Human contain method CleanTheRoom but each of them it implements differently?

share|improve this question
1  
Better stil would be to put the CleanTheRoom method definition in an IClean interface and implement that for the types of humans that can clean. Then you get free polymorhpism from being able to cast these humans to this interface. – ChristopheD Apr 4 '11 at 19:56
25  
It's definitely an example of sexism. – juharr Apr 4 '11 at 20:01
1  
@juharr and agism. – kenny Apr 4 '11 at 20:40

The benefit of polymorphism comes when you want to invoke the method CleanTheRoom() on some type of Human, but you don't care which one specifically.

By having CleanTheRoom() defined at the base class level, Human, you can write shorter, cleaner code elsewhere in your application whenever you are working with an instance of Human, whether it be a Man, Woman, or Child.

Polymorphism, for example, lets you avoid ugly conditional statements where you explicitly check for each type of Human and call a different method:

Good:

private void SomeMethod(Human h)
{
    //some logic
    h.CleanTheRoom();
    //more logic
}

Bad:

private void SomeMethod(Human h)
{
    //some logic
    if (h is Man)
        CleanRoomSlowly();
    else if (h is Woman)
        CleanRoomQuickly();
    else if (h is Child)
        GoofOff();
    //some logic
}
share|improve this answer
    
Also a good answer, for the same reasons expressed in the comment to JacobM. – Stargazer712 Apr 4 '11 at 20:07

What you have is a good example of inheritance. Polymorphism refers specifically to being able to refer to objects of different types by using a single type (the parent class or interface), something this type of inheritance makes possible. Like so:

List<Human> humans = new ArrayList<Human>();

humans.add(new Woman());
humans.add(new Woman());
humans.add(new Man());
humans.add(new Child());
humans.add(new Child());

foreach(Human hum in humans) {
   hum.CleanTheRoom(); //I don't know the type of hum, but I don't care
}

Say I've been collecting instances of Human from various locations -- I don't know what type each one is. But I can still iterate over them and call CleanTheRoom(), because they share a parent class.

I'll add a real-world example. Say I have an Invoice class with various subclasses for different types of Invoices -- maybe there are different kinds of Invoices for service clients versus customers who make one-time purchases. Sometimes I care deeply about the differences, and I only deal with one type. But sometimes I want to loop through all of the invoices for this month and print them out. If the parent class has a print() method (which may well be implemented differently by different types) then I can do that.

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1  
This is the best answer in my opinion. The value of polymorphism becomes apparent when you see it being used, not when you see it being defined. – Stargazer712 Apr 4 '11 at 20:02
    
I wish there was a succinct term to describe inheritance with polymorphism. Is there one? – Daisetsu Apr 5 '11 at 21:52
1  
Polymorphism that's based on parent classes is sometimes called "subtype polymorphism" in computer science. In the context of an object-oriented programming language, I've never seen the word "polymorphism" used to refer to anything other than subtype polymorphism (generics are also a form of polymorphism, technically, but we never refer to them that way). And going from the other side, I've never come across a form of inheritance that wouldn't permit polymorphism. So the word "polymorphism" seems sufficient within an object-oriented context. – Jacob Mattison Apr 6 '11 at 20:57
    
I'll add that in a real-world setting I doubt I ever use the word "polymorphism" aloud, although I will use "polymorphically", as in "Hey, we should factor out a parent class, so we can refer to all of these types polymorphically." – Jacob Mattison Apr 6 '11 at 20:59

Yes, that is correct. And you can call the method CleanTheRoom() without knowing which "kind" of human is it.

Here you have some basic examples.

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I think you fail to see the benefit, that's the key you're missing to fully understand polymorphism. I will try to make an example:

Let's say you have a simple CRUD form. This is the code of the save button:

var Client = PopulateDTO(); //put all the values in the controls, to an object

if(Action==Actions.Create){
  _repository.Create(Client);
}
else if(Action==Actions.Update){
  _repository.Update(Client);
}
else if(Action==Actions.Delete){
  _repository.Delete(Client);
}

this.Close();

This code works, but it's bad code, and difficult to read. Let's use polymorphism (and the strategy pattern):

public abstract class BaseStrategy{
  abstract void Do(ClientDto Client);
}

public class CreateStrategy:BaseStrategy{
  public override void Do(ClientDto Client){
    _repo.Save(Client);
  }
}

public class UpdateStrategy:BaseStrategy{
  public override void Do(ClientDto Client){
    _repo.Update(Client);
  }
}

public class DeleteStrategy:BaseStrategy{
  public override void Do(ClientDto Client){
    _repo.Delete(Client);
  }
}

So, we have an abstract class, and 3 implementations, each one doing something with the client object. Now, the code of the save button in the form will be:

BaseStrategy stg = GetCorrectStrategy();

var Client = PopulateDTO();

stg.Do(Client);

this.close;

And the method GetCorrectStrategy() will instantiate the correct Strategy implementation, depending if the user is creating, editing or deleting the client.

I hope this answer will help you. But if didn't help you, I suggest you read about strategy pattern, It's one of the best uses of polymorphism in my opinion

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Since several people have already given fine examples of polymorphism, I'll offer a different perspective that really helped me to grok it.

In functional programming, functions are the first class concepts in contrast to OOP where objects are supreme.

Polymorphism is to OOP what pattern matching is to FP. Here is a function that uses pattern matching (using an ML style syntax).

 let f x =
        match x with
        | T -> //do stuff with a T to return some value
        | S -> //do stuff with an S to return some value
        | U -> //do stuff with a U to return some value
        | V -> //do stuff with a V to return some value

So when you use the function f, you can pass it an object of either type T, S, U, or V. In strongly typed FP languages like F#, the type of x is denoted T|S|U|V. Such types are commonly referred to as Sum types or Tagged Unions.

If we fix up your example to make Human an abstract class, then it will become clear that polymorphism in OOP just gives you a way of expressing a sum type.

Thus, CleanTheRoom is a function that takes a type Human. But Human is just the name for the type Man|Woman|Child which is a sum type. The big difference between languages like C# and functional languages like F# is that one treats objects as top level things while the other treats functions as top level things. Also, everything in OOP languages like C# must have names. In a functional language we could denote the type Man|Woman|Child without having to explicitly name it.

The key is not to think of the code as having different CleanTheRoom methods, but rather think of CleanTheRoom as one method that takes a type Man|Woman|Child (which is named Human). Polymorphism is just the implementation detail.

In summary, polymorphism (especially with abstract classes) basically just give you a way to name sum types and do pattern matching.

See:

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An example in C#:

This is my class file

class parent
    {
        public virtual string saySomething(string s)
        {
            return s+":Parent";
        }
    }
    class man : parent
    {
        public override string saySomething(string s)
        {
            return s+":Man";
        }
    }
    class woman : parent
    {
        public override string saySomething(string s)
        {
            return s+":Woman";
        }
    }
    class child : parent
    {
        public override string saySomething(string s)
        {
            return s+":Child";
        }
    }

Create Four Buttons and a label.

Here is the implementation on a simple form1

private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
             p1= new parent();       

        }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {            
            label1.Text = p1.saySomething("I am parent!");
        }

        private void button2_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            p1 = new man();
            label1.Text = p1.saySomething("I am man!");
        }

        private void button3_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            p1 = new woman();
            label1.Text = p1.saySomething("I am woman!");
        }

        private void button4_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            p1 = new child();
            label1.Text = p1.saySomething("I am child!");
        }

Is it run-time polymorphism? P1 is an object. Depending upon the situation (Context), a button click, it is executing different piece of code. So, p1 is behaving differently depending upon the click event.

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If you look at this example side-ways it is polymorphism. But this example does not really show the power of polymorphism. – Gene S Oct 10 '12 at 20:42
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<ICleanTheRoom> cleanerList = new List<ICleanTheRoom>
            {
                new Child(), 
                new Woman(), 
                new Man()
            };
        foreach (var cleaner in cleanerList)
        {
            cleaner.CleanTheRoom();
        }
    }
}

internal interface ICleanTheRoom
{
    void CleanTheRoom();
}

// No need for super type

//class Human : ICleanTheRoom
//{
//   public virtual void CleanTheRoom()
//   {
//   }
//}


internal class Woman : ICleanTheRoom
{
    public void CleanTheRoom()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

class Man: ICleanTheRoom
{
    public void CleanTheRoom()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

class Child: ICleanTheRoom
{
    public void CleanTheRoom()
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}
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