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Ok, lets say I have classes such as the following:

public class KPIObject<T> //<--This class where T is the following classes
{
    public List<T> Data { get; set; }
    public string Caption { get; set; }
}

public class KPICycleCountAccuracyData //<--There are 20 of these with different names and values
{
    public string Facility { get; set; }
    public string CCAdjustedCases { get; set; }
    public string TotalCases { get; set; }
    public string CCAdjustedPercent { get; set; }
}

Then I have:

public List<ReportData>> ProcessAccountReport(GetAccountReport request)
{
    var data = new List<ReportData>();
    ProcessKPI(data, request.KPICycleCountAccuracy, "KPICycleCountAccuracy"); //<-- 20 of these
    return data;
}

Here is the ProcessKPI method:

private static void ProcessKPI<T>(List<ReportData> data, ICollection<KPIObject<T>> items, string name)
{
    if (items == null || items.Count <= 0) return;
    foreach (var item in items)
    {
        if (item.Data == null || item.Data.Count <= 0) continue;
        var temp = new List<object>();
        temp.AddRange((IEnumerable<object>)item.Data);
        data.Add(new ReportData { Data = temp, Name = name, Title = item.Caption });
    }
}

All of this works and compiles correctly, I am just wondering if this is the most efficient way of doing this.

Thanks.

EDIT

I changed process KPI to this:

private static void ProcessKPI<T>(ICollection<ReportData> data, ICollection<KPIObject<T>> items, string name)
        {
            if (items == null || items.Count <= 0) return;
            foreach (var item in items.Where(item => item.Data != null && item.Data.Count > 0))
            {
                data.Add(new ReportData { Data = (IEnumerable<object>)item.Data, Name = name, Title = item.Caption });
            }
        }
share|improve this question
    
Just to be clear what type of efficiency gain you are looking for: are you saying that you are making 20 calls to ProcessKPI() (one call for each of the 20 types you indicated in the first code snippet), and that if you added one more type you would have to add one more call to ProcessKPI(), etc.? And you are looking for a more scalable way to write this code? –  KP Taylor Apr 4 '11 at 19:56
    
Performance, less code, memory issues. Yes, if I add another class, I have to make another ProcessKPI call. –  Cyberdrew Apr 4 '11 at 19:57
1  
Not sure about the long of it, but I do know your data parameter doesn't need to be a ref since it's not a value type. –  Corey Coogan Apr 4 '11 at 19:58
    
Ok, I removed ref and changed the IEnumerable position. –  Cyberdrew Apr 4 '11 at 20:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Couple of comments

  • There is no need to make data a ref parameter in ProcessKPI. A ref parameter is only meaningful for a class type in C# if you actually assign to it. Here you're just modifying the object so ref doesn't by you anything except awkward call syntax
  • Even though Count is signed it won't ever return a negative value.
  • I would prefer (IEnumerable<object>)item.Data over the as IEnumerable<object> version. If the latter fails it will result in an ArgumentNullException when really it's a casting issue.
share|improve this answer
    
I removed ref and changed the IEnumerable placement. Thanks. –  Cyberdrew Apr 4 '11 at 20:02

Speed Assuming you are talking about computational efficiency (i.e. speed), there are two operations that you might be able to improve:

First, you create a copy of the item.Data in the temp variable. When you know that the resulting ReportData will never be modified, you may use the item.Data directly, forgoing the expensive copy operation.

data.Add(new ReportData { Data = (IEnumerable<object>)item.Data, Name = name, Title = item.Caption });

Second, converting to IEnumerable<object> will probably cause unnecessary boxing/unboxing at a later point. See if it makes sense for your application to add a generic type parameter to ReportData, so you may instantiate it as new ReportData<KPIObject>(). That way the compiler may do a better job of optimizing the code.

Memory By implementing your solution using continuations you may be able to process one ReportData element at a time instead of all at once, thereby reducing the memory footprint. Have a look at the yield statement to see how to impelement such an approach.

Other For futher code quality improvements, JaredPar's answer offers some exellent advice.

share|improve this answer
    
Great suggestion. –  Cyberdrew Apr 4 '11 at 20:25
1  
I think you're mistaken, I don't see any copying whatsoever in this method. The list operations are all references, and the string copies are all references. So at most he's copying some pointer addresses. Also I believe your statements about boxing are unjustified unless the OP is working with List<int> etc, there is no boxing occurring when the types are reference types. -1 for this, +1 for the yield information –  Chris Marisic Apr 4 '11 at 20:29
1  
@ChrisMarisic AddRange() indeed copies all references, not the complete objects. I did not mean to imply that all strings are copied. But it's still those 20 references that have to be copied in each iteration; references that may live in a discontiguous stretch of memory depending on the implementation of List<T>. It's cost may be small, but leaving out AddRange()'s copy operation is definitely faster than leaving it in. –  Arjen Kruithof Apr 4 '11 at 20:41

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